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Tin Can Lids

Started by hallwoo, November 17, 2023, 07:25:29 PM

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hallwoo

from  elecrtic  can opener on  canned foods  should make good outdoor spinning targets mpunted on rebar or camp stakes with piano wire, cover with orange duct tape   

Alan

I don't know why so many posts for one subject, but I wouldn't use any of the things mentioned. There is a reason, I believe, why so many shooters use hardened steel plates—they're almost indestructible. Even when hit by large-caliber firearms, they just swing away. Shot with airgun BBs, pellets, and slugs, they'll last a very long time. And repainting them a different color each time, makes the hits more obvious. And I like the "ting" too!
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).

hallwoo

I'll use the steel brackets  from the discarded   garage door opener  to build a frame for mounting the propellor spinning targets which will be made out of  iron flanges for 1/2 inch pipe strung on piano wire

U can always find a FREE garage door opener on Craigslist

steveoh

I have a variety of cheap factory made spinners, baling wire strung with old spoons, stainless spinners from eBay, a sheet of hard steel, some 3/8" plate steel targets from Craigslist, and some thick plates that Kevin had made up.

My problem is I can't use any in the backyard as I have 7 adjoining neighbors and I do not want any attention from them. Quiet is a must. If I shoot in backyard it's at 5 gallon bucket filled with rubber mulch or a wood target with a couple layers of duct putty. The big bores don't come out, and the loud rifles stay in.

But I sure love the sound of hitting steel. And oh the giggles when I destroy small caliber steel with big bore lead. :)
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Steelhead

I'm with you, Hallwoo.

I agree with Alan that hardened steel makes effective targets, but I also think that it's boring (especially for small bore) Part of the allure of airguns is the flexibility allowed by the reduced power as opposed to a firearm. You can use innumerable things for targets that cannot be used (at least reused) by firearms.

Heavier steel plates suck to tote around. Nor do they move much or at all when hit with small bore. Things like tin can lids spin, flip, and otherwise have motion when hit. That's why spinners are so fun. Spoons, can lids, big washers...the sky's the limit.

Watching things bounce, fly, explode, or fall over is what makes airgun shooting so much fun.   
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Gerard

I save can lids of various sizes. Not just for airgun use, but for my 9mm carbine and .22lr takedown rifle besides. Occasionally it's fun to hang a lid from a tree branch at greater distance and see how well I can group some holes in it, or dents when it comes to the airguns. And they do jump around satisfyingly besides. Cheap (free) fun.

Steelhead

#6
Speaking of targets and ranges, I had a cool range at my old place. I COULD do the same here where I'm at (plenty of space), but there are obstacles. Everywhere that there's enough space for @ 200 yards, there's either roaming cattle (knocking over any semi-permanent target stands), tillable farmland, would require a hike to the shooting area, or would interfere with deer hunting by pushing them out with the activity. But I digress...

I had hanging steel (among other metal types, like stainless) at 25 yard intervals from 25 yards to 200 yards. I could literally walk out of my door and my "ground zero" bench was right next to my garage. To say it was convenient was an understatement. However, GETTING the steel to all of those targets was an undertaking. I made many trips with a wheelbarrow back and forth. Having steel was great. Repaint whenever, nice sound, can see impacts perfectly, always there and ready. And that brings me to the point..."there and ready".

Packing it around is no fun. One single small one? Okay. I loved having steel at my permanent range. But I loathe taking it with me on shoots. I have to find something to hang it on. Most places I shoot are open and you need a target stand. Now I have to bring a steel fence post and a pounder for EACH YARDAGE! And the custom T's that fit on the top to hang targets.

I've done this for a couple of years now and I can tell you that it sucks. The last couple of times I actually set up to do some shooting (been way to long) I didn't bring the steel. It was enough to have some target stands and big pieces of cardboard to get the job done.

Not to beat dead horse, but it's the dead of winter. Not the greatest time to be out shooting airguns depending on where you live, so musing about targets and ranges passes the time. Here are some tips in no particular order that I have learned through trial and error that makes range and non-hunting/recreational shooting more enjoyable and less work:

1) If you use steel plates, keep them under 12"x12" and very thin. I think most of my plates are @ 3/8" and those are perfect for big bore as they will not dent but still swing and 'deaden' the slugs.

2) 1/8" steel is great for small bore, AND long-range big bore. 1/8" sounds great, is lightweight, and you could more easily manage a bigger target. My favorite steel target is @ 36"x36" 1/8". I put that one out at 200-400 yards and it's loads of fun. It dents up but I just keep flipping it over.

3) Do not use regular firearm steel targets. If you already own them, great, but don't waste your money. They weigh a ton and it's just overkill and overwork to move them around.

4) I'm lucky enough to have two friends who are welders by trade. One is a machinist/aluminum/stainless specialist and the other is structural/ornamental. There's always a plethora of scraps that they have; most of the time they end up in a barrel to be picked up by a recycler. I throw them a few dollars, buy a lunch, or whatever we friends do and take some nice sized drop pieces. I bought the 36" piece from a local fab shop out of their remnant bin. I think it was @ $30.00. Not bad for a 3'x3' steel target that can be hit with a .50 Texan (big dimple, lol) The point is, find a welder or a fab shop by you and just ask. You might be surprised and end up with more than you need for a pittance of the cost.

5) Cleanliness and keeping things decent might be a factor depending on the site. Be wary of things that make a mess or worse. It sounds obvious, but we've all had one of those 'it was at that he moment he realized he @#$%ed up' events. Anywhere I shoot will eventually have cattle grazing so no glass, ever. Nor anything that can't be easily picked up when done. Soda cans tend to draw yellow jackets too.

6) Clay pigeons. We all get bored at the range; at least I do. I took some clay pigeons to a dirt mound and sat back at about 50-60 yards with my .25 Impact. As I hit the target offhand a few times it started to break into smaller pieces. I then went to using the rest and continued to work my way through all of the visible fragments. It sounds simple, but it was really entertaining and the randomness of the size/angle of the scraps made for some very challenging shooting. I'd go at it until I couldn't see any color and then put another one out.

7) If you can ever get your hands on some appropriately sized stainless steel, GET IT. It's light, super hard, has a great sound, and did I mention light? Big bore will dent it up pretty good (thanks, Steveoh) though.

Anyway, early Sunday morning today, New Year's Eve, getting some fishing gear ready for tomorrow, drinking coffee, and thinking about shooting when I should be doing housework.
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Uslanja

I know this post is a few weeks old but thought I would jump in.  One thing that is fun to shoot and you can eat them as well are "marshmallow peeps".  They explode pretty nice and once your tired of shooting, their quite tasty.  Doesn't have the ring of steel but sure is filling......I mean fun.

Alan

Let's see. Lead-filled treats hit the spot, kills your liver, like it or not!
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).