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Something has occurred to me…

Started by Alan, January 03, 2023, 01:05:30 PM

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Alan

With some fear of waxing poetically...

It wasn't that long ago (2009), that some of us looked forward to receiving a Benjamin Marauder for Christmas. What we got, wasn't what we truly longed for. Triggers were monumentally poor, the power adjustments were rudimentary, and efficiency was nonexistent. However, at the time, the Benjamin Marauder was one of the few commercially-available, PCP airguns, that was easily modified.

Thankfully, after-market suppliers (typically one man operations) fabricated and sold a myriad of upgraded parts. Those available upgrades did improve the seven pound beast in many ways. Best of all, information on modifying the valves, hammers, and transfer ports were readily available. You could even upgrade to a carbon fiber tank replete with regulation, if you had the monies. Of course, that required replacing the pressed-wood stock with an aluminum one. For some, it was pure joy. However, in the final analogy of the Benjamin saga, it is fair to say we paid too much, and received too little.

Fast forward to 2023, and things are much brighter for us airgunners. There are now at least 25 different airgun manufacturers, with some making nearly a dozen different models, with names which conger up nostalgia like the Marauder——Not!

Todays PCP airguns, sport unbelievable accuracy; feather-touch, fully adjustable, two-stage triggers; one or more regulators; and have a myriad of power adjustment. We are truly blessed!

Happy New Year everyone!
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).

Steelhead

I remember getting railed up, down and sideways for saying the same thing. All of the 'Marauder Honks' who were so emotionally attached to a piece of metal could not comprehend why anyone would anything else than a Marauder. There was a time, yes...but like all things time-related it changes.

I'm not expert on the history of modern pcp's, but it seems the transition from the Discovery to the Marauder was a big leap. Now there was a repeater capable of more power and better accuracy (the Big 2). On top of that, like the Disco, parts and mods were being made to improve on the Big 2. As an airgun owner, you NEEDED to be a capable enough mechanic to be able to break your gun down and replace o rings or add upgraded parts. If you couldn't do this, you were severely handicapped.

For tinkerers, this became an obsession and a way for talented mechanics to separate themselves from the pack. I think this is especially true around competitions like field target shooting and super-accurate/long range bench shooting. I totally understand and appreciate this as I have experienced it with other passions. When I started steelhead fishing there was no internet nor cell phones. I learned and honed my craft through mentorship, hard work, and determination. I drove hours to rivers to just to confirm that they were too high to fish when others stayed home and played the odds. Once in a while it paid off in spades, most times not so. But I digress...the point is that I took what was available to me and pushed the limits of my time, wallet, and physical energy. And I had more success than most, or at least more than those willing to just wait for the perfect scenario. There's a sense of accomplishment that comes from taking a hobby or craft to its limits and achieving success that others cannot.

Once you introduce a revolutionary concept or item (internet, cell phones, airgun regulators, slug projectiles, etc.) it's hard to let go of those investments in time, money, and blood that you've put into what you to do. Now others can just show up and buy what you worked so long and hard to get. Non-mechanical guys like me can buy turnkey airguns that are light years ahead of a Marauder and shoot circles around it right out of the box. I also cannot catch a fish within sight of anyone and not see them immediately texting or calling their buddies saying, 'The guy below me has got one on!' Seemingly out of nowhere cars start showing up and I'm suddenly crowded out of my fishing spot by a slew of flat-brimmed hat wearing, Facebook watching, never-caught-a-fish-but-have-a-$400.00-rod guys. The next day? Forget it. The hole that I had to myself will have 15 guys lined up shoulder to shoulder. Such as the way it is in the modern era.

Things change. Equipment changes. Sometimes for the better, sometimes not so much. We have fond memories of the 'good ol' days', but it isn't bringing them back. I have learned that I do things the way that I WANT to do them; what's most enjoyable. That doesn't always mean more effective, and that's okay. Having the best shooting Marauder in the county is a cool thing, even though some moop (like me) with an Impact can outshoot it easily. Catching a steelie on a swung fly is a much bigger deal than catching the same fish on roe or hardware. The key is 'Are you having fun?' If the answer is yes, then you're succeeding. I'm all over the map and that's the way I like it. Some things I want turnkey and I'm grateful that option is there for me. Other things I want to make myself, and I'm grateful for that too.
Airforce Texan .308
FX Impact MKII .25
Benjamin Discovery .22
Benjamin Prowler .177
Texan .50
Sam Yang 909s Light Hunter
Born Wild Shooting Chair
Air Venturi compressor

Alan

I agree with you. If I have a shorter version, it is simply this statement:

Do what makes YOU happy, whether or not is makes someone else happy.
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).

Frank in Fairfield

#3
There is new interest on the new Marauders.
I have three Gen I.
I do not like and will not own air rifles that look like an AR15/M16.
I didn't like them when I was in the service and I don't like them now.
(I do have a Crosman SBR...)n the box)
I understand why the younger shooters like them.
The keyboard commandos.
Especially the newer veterans love of them as, most of them never held a firearm until they were in basic training.
Adult airguns fill a niche needed because of overcrowding and loss of public space.
To be used by adults with a large amount of expendable resources.
Air arms, sports cars, cameras, computers are all the same when it comes to spending money.
And, about the Marauder trigger...At the start of his company, Thomas Air Rifles used the Marauder trigger in those $4000.00 rifles..
Buy the most expensive item you can afford that will serve your needs and, never look at a catalog again.

Steelhead

I think the real beauty of this is that the Marauder is still relevant AND still available. At least you know what you're getting: a proven platform, simple design, highly adaptable to mods, and perhaps the perfect gun to learn the physics of airgun mechanics. Can't think of another gun that checks off as many boxes.

To play devil's advocate, it's equally beautiful to not have it be the ONLY choice. There was a time not too long ago that Mrods and especially companies that built custom guns based on that platform were at the top of heap for accuracy and power. Technology and innovation have advanced the sport so that numerous guns are able to exceed the range and accuracy of the Mrod, but that shouldn't diminish what the Mrod is nor its (still ongoing) place in the airgun market. Have to think it's the best-selling airgun of all time; nothing really to base that on other than it would just seem so.

I think of the same thing when see an old '60's front engine dragster, nitro burning, iron block hemi. Absolutely incredible machine that in the capable hands is running well over 200mph and 6.5 - 7 second 1/4 mile passes. Just an amazing piece of engineering and craftsmanship. Then I see a 2022 top fuel dragster. 330mph in under four seconds. The old slingshot can't compete with that, but that slingshot is still going REALLY quick. Both runs are impressive, but for different reasons and making literal comparisons isn't fair. As far as enjoyment to race? Different story.

I'm not much of archer, but I wonder if the same thing happened to the archery world when compound bows hit the market? Recurves became obsolete, but certainly a lot of aesthetics would seem to have been lost when the pullies and cables showed up. 

   
Airforce Texan .308
FX Impact MKII .25
Benjamin Discovery .22
Benjamin Prowler .177
Texan .50
Sam Yang 909s Light Hunter
Born Wild Shooting Chair
Air Venturi compressor

Frank in Fairfield

Steel,
You are correct.
You are not much of an archer.
I started with a longbow in the 50s.
I progressed through the recurve (we all wanted to be Fred Bear) then compounds in the 80s and 90s.
I hunt close.
I have shot 6 black tail deer and 4 pronghorn antelope with a rifle.
None of these were outside of 75 yards.
Game taken with stick and bow has never been further than 27 yards for me.
When you shoot with a compound, you have to use your rangefinder, then select the right pin and then assume the proper stance And hope the game is still waiting for you.
With a longbow or recurve you throw up the bow and launch an arrow instinctively just like throwing a baseball to first base.
Now at 77 the circle is complete with my 60 Bear Montana longbow.

CraigH

Craig

Lone Tree, Colorado

steveoh

I had a first generation .25 Marauder. Had it "tuned" for backyard accuracy, quietness, consistency and shot count (15-35yards). This was back when he who must not be named owned the forum.

I paid he who must not be named good money to tune the Marauder and found out later it was Michael who tuned the thing. Hmmmm. It came back certainly tuned as I asked for. It had the original hammer replaced with a "high performance" hammer that sometimes suffered from sticking. So much for a tune when the hammer sticks.

When the hammer behaved the Marauder was very accurate, super quiet (no thanks to the clipping moderator that he who must not be named included. I swapped the moderator out for a Neil Clague and that fixed the clipping and made the rifle whisper quiet.

Marauders are not light and the weight helped me make the decision to part with it. At the time I was in the middle of having not one, but two frozen shoulders and there was no way I could shoot freehand the thing.

In the backyard the Marauder and my old beloved Sumatra were every bit as accurate as my FX Impact (no matter the tune, or ammo). The Sumatra was sold to pay for the FX.

Right now my Impact is tuned to fling slugs and holy hell am I dialed in to 15-35 yards and the Rats fall a little harder than they did with the Marauder. Of course the FX sounds mighty loud at midnight as it makes rats almost explode.

The Marauder was a good rifle and super accurate when dialed in to a known distance. But sometimes it felt as balanced as trying to hold an 8' waterlogged fir 4x4.

The Impact, though not light has its weight closer to me and feels quite balanced. That left shoulder of mine is still not completely healed from the frozen state, and long, heavy unbalanced rifles hold little interest.

Oh but the Texan deserves a little love. I reckon I'm full of contradictions as I lurch from one thought and rifle to the next.

 :o
Quackenbush .58 Outlaw
Shooting Chairs
Vallejo Ferry Schedule
DAQ .458 LA Outlaw Rifle
DAQ .58 LA Outlaw Rifle
FX Streamline .25
FX M3 Impact 700mm Sniper .25
Benjamin Bulldog .357
QB-79 .177
Crosman 1322
Crosman 1377 - HoRodded 10 FPE
Diana Model 27 (childhood airgun)
Tolman Skiff
Airgun Calculator

Steelhead

I wonder what the age cutoff is where one transitions from a 'bitter, grumpy, bitcher-and-complainer who's sees the worst in everything' to a 'cute, crusty curmudgeon who has a cynical outlook'. Recent data shows it's at least older than 77.  ;D  ;D  ;D
Airforce Texan .308
FX Impact MKII .25
Benjamin Discovery .22
Benjamin Prowler .177
Texan .50
Sam Yang 909s Light Hunter
Born Wild Shooting Chair
Air Venturi compressor

Frank in Fairfield

Your will probably never reach that plateau.

Alan

From one pre-fossil to another (you know who you are!), Frank is correct. You reach a dead-end plateau in your life, when suddenly you cannot laugh at yourself. Don't let that happen!!
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).

bnowlin

LOL you know when you become a fossil when people your age look to you like they are all older than you.
Bobn

Alan

Stages of life:

1). Seen but not heard.
2). Told to shut up!
3). Lip service given.
4). People listen.
5). People start to believe you.
6). People turn to you for advice.
7). And finally... They follow it!
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).

CraigH

Quote from: bnowlin on January 05, 2023, 07:56:54 PMLOL you know when you become a fossil when people your age look to you like they are all older than you.
Bobn

Post-Fossil  ---  When you suddenly realize you look like those people.  :o
Craig

Lone Tree, Colorado

Steelhead

LOL you know when you become a fossil when people your age look to you like they are all older than you.
Bobn


OMG, yes! I'm at an age/stage in my life (mid 50's) where I don't perceive myself as old as I am. Example: I was at the bank a while back wearing an old AC/DC concert tshirt from the 80's. The cute 20-something teller said, 'Nice shirt!', with a smile. I said, 'Thanks! Are you an AC/DC fan?' Her response was, 'No, but my dad and grandpa TOTALLY are. They used to go concerts and everything!'.

The analogy of what my ego looked like at the time? I went from Kevin Costner to Ernest Borgnine in about 3 seconds.  ;D  ;D  ;D
Airforce Texan .308
FX Impact MKII .25
Benjamin Discovery .22
Benjamin Prowler .177
Texan .50
Sam Yang 909s Light Hunter
Born Wild Shooting Chair
Air Venturi compressor