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Lubricating oil/paste

Started by Adolfo, June 10, 2021, 03:50:56 PM

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Adolfo

I have a Brocock Bantam.  The original that was priced about $900 back in the day.  You really can't find anything under $1200 now a days. Anyway, I added a huma regulator and when I took it apart, I realized my cocking lever was a little sticky.  I saw a video on a take down on a pcp rifle which was great but it sped through on the rebuild.  I understood cleaning and maybe polishing some of the parts but no where did it explain the type of oil was used.  I used to be a paintballer and I have some stuff left over from those days.  I would think the stuff would work with a PCP rifle since it deals with high pressure air and bolts.  I was wondering what you guys use.  Regular oil or silicone paste.  What are your thoughts?
Adolfo

nervoustrigger

Assuming we are talking about lubricating metal parts, almost anything except a silicone-based lubricant will work well.  Silicone is only suited for elastomers (rubber) or plastic components, including where they move against metal parts, but it is useless for metal-on-metal.

A cocking lever sees no high pressure air so feel free to use a hydrocarbon lubricant like 30W oil or a common grease.  However I will say I am of the mind that if a part needs a viscous grease to operate satisfactorily, I'd rather smooth and polish it so it will work well with an oil, light oil, or even a dry lube.  By oil I mean something like the aforementioned 30W oil.  Light oil meaning 3-in-1 oil or pneumatic tool oil.  Dry lube meaning molybdenum disulfide, tungsten disulfide, or graphite powder burnished into the surfaces.

Alan

Very correct reply.

Although alluded to, you never want to lube anything under pressure, with a petroleum-based lubricant. They'll diesel, with a blown up airgun, the typical results!
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).