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Trigger Adjustment

Started by dgiannandrea, April 10, 2020, 09:57:24 AM

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dgiannandrea

I would like to take out some of the seer creep in the trigger of my Daystate Regal. Not 1st stage travel, but 2nd stage break. I tried to attach an image of the trigger group from a parts diagram but without success/luck. Looking at the owner's manual of a more advanced trigger, I think the adjustment I want to do is called "2nd stage contact". I'm capable, just need direction and encouragement.

Here's the plan, refer to attached drawing, please advise. I need to file either the seer (4.4) or the catch block (4.3, probably incorrect term). The 4.3 has an angled face behind/under the seer contact area. I plan to file this face down to decrease the contact surface with the seer. I know if I go to far I will be buying parts, but hey, I've backups.

Anybody worked on the Daystate Regal trigger??

David

Alan

I've only shot a Daystate, but never owned one. This said, it is my understanding that the trigger is fully adjustable for both creep and let off in both stages. It appears the drawing supports that assumption. In any case, Daystate's are not cheap airguns, and I'd be stunned if this weren't the case.

From a safety standpoint, I wouldn't mess with grinding, filing, or stoning any sear surface, without the requisite tools and how-to knowledge.
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).

PaAirgunner

Do not file. If you file the sear or the intermediate lever you will remove the hardening. To reduce sear engagement you need to first remove the locking screw that is in your intermediate lever (4.4). This screw is in front of the trigger blade. (You may have to remove the trigger guard to get to it, I don't remember it's been a while since I had my Regal) Once you remove this screw you will find another screw under it. Turning it clockwise will decrease the engagement. If you go too far the gun will not cock. If you do that, then just turn it CCW like a 1/4 turn or until it is acceptable to you.

dgiannandrea

#3
Absolutely right on: Thanks Alan and PaAirgunner.

The Daystate manual was a bit off to my understanding. Where it referred to '2nd stage weight' I would interpret as the size of the break. As Alan said, it's a Daystate, it's adjustable. Thanks to PaAirgunner for giving me the direction (and courage) to find the adjustment.

Before I started, the 1st stage travel was huge. After 1st stage adjustment the trigger actually felt adequate...but I was into it by then. I found a 1/16" hex wrench the best fit to unlock the 2nd state adjustment. As it was all apart on the bench at that point, I just gave the 2nd stage adjustment screw a slight turn, 60 degrees, and that was it. Right on.

Pictures of the process:
00 - the distance bushing needs to be removed. It was a tight fit. Replacement required a screwdriver to stretch the gap.
01 - trigger group vs the manual
02 - exploded trigger group
03 - locking screw (on 1/16" hex) and 2nd stage adjustment screw

So much more fun now.
David

Alan

You need to spend $20 and buy one of these:

https://smile.amazon.com/TEKTON-Wrench-Metric-30-Piece-25253/dp/B00I5TH074/ref=sr_1_5?dchild=1&keywords=allen+wrenches&qid=1586633167&sr=8-5

Daystate, FX, and most other EU manufacturers all use metric Allen wrenches. This "kit" has both, and has been a godsend for me. Where else could you fins a .7 mm Allen wrench???
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).

PaAirgunner

Glad to help. That Allen should have been 1.5mm I think.

dgiannandrea

#6
Yes, it should have been.
But the 1.5mm was spinning inside the hex socket, while the 1/6" was snug. I won't suggest that this applies to all, it just turned out this way in mine

One year later: I discovered that the allen key set has horrible tolerances. That was discovered on another task when I got out my digital micrometer and miced the keys against a Craftsman set because they were failing me. So, buying this on Amaz** for $20 was not a great deal.