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#1
General Airgun Forum Discussion / Re: What Happened ???
Last post by Gerard - Today at 07:02:58 PM
Some folks in forums enjoy using riddles. I've never liked riddles. The genre seems to depend on the simple trick of leaving out crucial information, making resolving a solution a matter of wild guesses and luck.

So 'stuff' may seem like enough of a hint to the author... but means exactly nothing to this old dummy.

My own interest in airguns has recently been tweaked by acquisition of an Artemis PP750 and an Edgun Leshiy 2. Both of which needed tuning, of course. So that gave me excuses to do a lot of online research and spend some hours tinkering on them in the workshop - one of my favourite pastimes. Now that they are both 'perfect' for my intended uses, I'm just awaiting some nice weather, coupled with a day of halfway decent energy, so I can get out and try them at proper distances. Meantime the Artemis has dropped 2 grey squirrels so I'm pleased enough with that, at least for back yard range. At 38fpe the Leshiy would be a bit intense for squirrels. I'm keener to try it at longer range and see how it can group.

As for forum posting... well, not a lot to say beyond the above. Airguns remain fun to shoot. I like mine in formats which fit neatly in backpacks to take along when hiking. And hiking can only happen if the kidney cancer drug does its job well enough and stops crippling me with nasty side effects. So I'm left to imagine going shooting until that happens.
#2
Quote from: bnowlin on Today at 03:11:06 PM
Quote from: Bob La Londe on Today at 02:43:08 PMSeriously, I've lost interest in airguns except as another tool when needed, so I know why I haven't been around.  Well that and I got tired of some of the... well... stuff. 

I see a low density of "recent" posts. 

Have people lost interest in the Air Gun Forum with no... er... some rules? 

Stuff?

Yep.  "Stuff" 
#3
General Airgun Forum Discussion / Re: What Happened ???
Last post by bnowlin - Today at 03:11:06 PM
Quote from: Bob La Londe on Today at 02:43:08 PMSeriously, I've lost interest in airguns except as another tool when needed, so I know why I haven't been around.  Well that and I got tired of some of the... well... stuff. 

I see a low density of "recent" posts. 

Have people lost interest in the Air Gun Forum with no... er... some rules? 

Stuff?
#4
General Airgun Forum Discussion / What Happened ???
Last post by Bob La Londe - Today at 02:43:08 PM
Seriously, I've lost interest in airguns except as another tool when needed, so I know why I haven't been around.  Well that and I got tired of some of the... well... stuff. 

I see a low density of "recent" posts. 

Have people lost interest in the Air Gun Forum with no... er... some rules? 
#5
Steelhead;

Ihanks
for looking in and your comments.

Garey

#6
PCP, C02, and Helium Powered Airguns / Re: Crosman Model 160 .22 cal.
Last post by Steelhead - February 21, 2024, 06:25:27 AM
What a great post. Thank you for the detail and awesome descriptions.
#7
PCP, C02, and Helium Powered Airguns / Re: Crosman Model 160 .22 cal.
Last post by Alan - February 21, 2024, 04:04:43 AM
It is interesting to note, the size of the groups—yours and theirs. This is a common thread for most of Crosman's airguns, from pump to CO2. It appears, after all, that either their "shooter" is extra keen-eyed, or they use a machine rest to get these groups!
#8
Steveoh;

Tks for looking in; Great point on the Chinese Clones !!!!!!

Garey
#9
PCP, C02, and Helium Powered Airguns / Re: Crosman Model 160 .22 cal.
Last post by steveoh - February 20, 2024, 12:34:56 PM
These were so good that the Chinese made clones of them. I own a couple of clones. :)
#10
PCP, C02, and Helium Powered Airguns / Crosman Model 160 .22 cal.
Last post by mindsweeper333 - February 20, 2024, 10:32:08 AM
                           Excerpt from my CD "Old Airguns and Memories"
Hello to all,

The Crosman Model 160 Pellgun .22 caliber/ M167 .177 cal. dual CO2 cartridge rifles introduced in 1955 were perhaps the most famous of all the CO2 rifles made by Crosman in what has been called the Golden Age of CO2 rifles. The M-160 was used by our Military, USAF being one branch, as a training aid in marksmanship etc. they were provided with sling swivels, S331 peep sights (made by Mossberg) and a military type sling, the NRA also used the M-160 in some of their training programs. The CMP (Civilian Marksmanship Program) also had a number of these rifles as training aids in their programs, in fact my M-160 rifle came from the CMP complete with the operating manual, sling, sealed bottle of Pellgun oil, and USAF Service Tag with serial number, a supply inspection dated 07-APR. 1971, and a final distribution inspection date of JUN. 21, 1985. For some reason my M-160 did not have the sling stock swivels, nor were they with the packaging? The M-160 had a really storied career that lasted from 1955-1971.

Factory specs were listed as follows, weight 5lbs. 10 ounces, overall length 39 ¼ inches, rifled barrel length 21 ½ inches and hardwood stock with a stain finish, approximate muzzle velocity 650 fps. Several sight variations were utilized including the S-331 Peep sight, #360 peep sight and step adjustable open rear sight. Two 12 gm. CO2 cartridges provided the power source.

My M-160 had the safety on the die cast trigger guard, (third variant). One unique feature of the M-160 series was the cocking mechanism, which was bolt operated but utilized the feature of cocking on "closing" not when the bolt was retracted as it was on other Crosman air rifles.  This feature satisfied the training aspect for the Military and NRA programs.

Charging the M-160 (make sure rifle is not loaded) required removal of the screw on tube cap, inserting the first 12 grain CO2 cartridge small neck end first and then the 2nd with small neck end muzzle forward, replacing the tube cap, tighten firmly by hand piercing the cartridge and then back off ¼ turn which will release CO2 from the front CO2 cartridge, cock the rifle and fire, this will pierce the 2nd CO2 cartridge and the rifle is now fully charged.

My M-160 came direct from the CMP, it was in extremely good condition, the bluing was excellent no rust or patina anywhere, the stock had a couple of small blemishes (rub marks) most likely from storage bumps. It looked to have been used very little, a very good example indeed. Approximate production date of 1971.
I received my M-160 in 1986 it was in very good shooting condition, and I shot it many times thru the intervening years, when I decided to put this "NOTEBOOK" together in 2014 I gave the rifle another complete valve rebuild, but other than that it is in the same condition as I initially received it.

After the above valve rebuild it was time for some field range testing, as is my normal practice I used three ½ inch adhesive dots on cardstock paper set at 25 yards and shot from a bench rest, 5 shots on each dot. I used 3 pellets, Crosman Discovery -14.3 grains.

JSB Diabolo- 15.9 grains and Predator Poly Mag- 16.1 grains.  All Chronographing was performed with muzzle 2 ft. from first sky screen.

The first 5 shot group with Crosman Discovery measured 1.135" (4 into .750") average velocity 679 fps. 2nd. 5 shot group with JSB Diabolo measured .875" average velocity 631 fps. 3rd 5 shot group with Predator PolyMag measured 1.880"average velocity 565 fps.

A total of 30 shots with the three different pellet weights averaged 623 fps and 13.28 ft. lbs (I averaged the three pellet weights for 15.4 grains. for these figures). A shot count of 40 would be available but one must consider declining velocities after shot #30.

The accuracy test proved one thing for sure my 72 year old (at the time) eyes did not tolerate a .040" aperture, spider webs were prevalent!! I could have opened the aperture to about 0.80" and probably done much better or certainly a scope would have "dramatically" improved my accuracy results, but I have no intention of making any such changes on this air rifle it will remain as I received it!!

While I was unable to do justice to the accuracy potential of this M-160, because of my reluctance to Scope or make any changes, these rifles if prepared properly can deliver astounding accuracy, a fellow by the name of Ron Robinson, yep same fellow who makes the Classic Scope mounts I have used, has won a Texas State Champion trophy and two NRA national record certificates with a Scoped M-160 .22 caliber (excerpted from his book "Airgun Chronicles") these M-160 rifles can be very accurate!

The JSB Diabolo .22 pellets would consistently delivery concentric .750" - .875" groups and were the pellet of choice, the Crosman Discovery .22 pellets could almost match the JSB but always gave up a flier in groups, the Predator Poly Mag. .22 pellets simply do not perform well at these velocities at least in my experience! Considering my difficulty with the small aperture on the excellent S331 Peep sight I will be perfectly happy with the groups achieved with the JSB pellets, it is after all minute of Squirrel head at 25 yards!

I am on the lookout for another 3rd variant M-160 that I can set up like I want too which would include a CO2 extension tube set up for bulk fill, a 2-7 x 32 AO scope, set the trigger at about 1.75 -2.00 lbs and in general attend to all areas that would extract the most accuracy possible. As a matter of note this Mod -160 did not require a clearance bushing for the action stud as I have done on most other Crosman rifles; it was a very close fit! I believe with the steps outlined above ½ inch groups at 25 yard might be attainable with the right pellet and 50-60 shots possible on a charge.

The Model 160 .22 caliber is legendary and one of the finest air rifles Crosman ever made, if you get the chance, by all means get one before you can no longer find one, you will regret if you don't!

Garey

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