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live long and pew pew pew

Started by spingerpreacher, October 15, 2022, 04:13:05 PM

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spingerpreacher

I'm Frank. I'm a computer tech and a firearms instructor/coach. The former, about 30 years, the latter, about five. Guess which one pays the rent? :)

Ex-Army, mostly Germany, 1983-1991. I'm 56 now, that was a lifetime ago.


NRA life member, plus a few others gun advocate/sporting groups.

My wife, Sandi, runs a costume shop.


I'm into all guns, but air-rifles are my passion. Just something simple and peaceful about it. It's a lot harder than it looks.

Besides the other typical NRA basic certs, I'm NRA certified Small-bore/Air-rifle Coach lvl2 (National). Also not particularly easy.


Other hobbies include martial-arts, Amateur "ham" radio. Also have a commercial and experimental radio license.

Some might say I'm a bit of a Trekkie.



Well, let's call that enough, eh? If you stuck around this long, well, bless you for caring. 100+ Karma points for you. :cool:


Later all!


Frank

Alan

You'll fit in just fine here, thank you. And I bet this too; your wife is rather busy this time of year?

All that aside, there is nothing wrong with being a Trekkie, or a techie! I too was "in" the communications field my whole career, having started with Graybar Electric in the early '60s. At 82, all of that is behind me, except amateur radio (KØBG). Put a .com after that for more information.
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).

steveoh

Quackenbush .58 Outlaw
Shooting Chairs
Vallejo Ferry Schedule
DAQ .458 LA Outlaw Rifle
DAQ .58 LA Outlaw Rifle
FX Streamline .25
FX M3 Impact 700mm Sniper .25
Benjamin Bulldog .357
QB-79 .177
Crosman 1322
Crosman 1377 - HoRodded 10 FPE
Diana Model 27 (childhood airgun)
Tolman Skiff
Airgun Calculator

Steelhead

Welcome aboard. We haven't had much success at organizing an Airgun Guild shooting competition, but maybe it's possible that we can put our heads together and do a Bat'leth tournament.
Airforce Texan .308
FX Impact MKII .25
Benjamin Discovery .22
Benjamin Prowler .177
Texan .50
Sam Yang 909s Light Hunter
Born Wild Shooting Chair
Air Venturi compressor

spingerpreacher

Bat'leth?  Nah, I prefer to destroy my enemies from afar.  A safe distance from all those sharp objects. :)


Alan

"I'm giving her all I got, Jim!"
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).

Loren


spingerpreacher

thanks for the welcomes! 8)

what i'm out back plinkin' with at the moment...


Alan

My issues with springers, especially gas piston break barrels, are barrel droop caused by repeated hard cocking, and lousy designed hinges. In this respect, side or bottom levered airguns have a distinct advantage.
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).

spingerpreacher

Ya know Alan, I've never ever noticed that.  And I've easily had 50 break-barrels in the past 10 years.

But I don't tend to keep them more than a couple years, and usually buy new.  Could be I don't use them long enough to break them.  Still, never once experienced "droop" in the short distance I shoot (25Y).

I kinda wonder, although I agree with the logic, if it's really just an urban legend that side and under levers have that advantage.

Haven't seen any real science on it, just anecdotal.

Alan

I've owned three break barrels. All of them were made by UMAREX. The worse one was a .177 Octane. The first one wouldn't cock most of the time. The dealer replaced it. After about 500 rounds, you could measure the barrel droop with a ruler. Even then, 25 yards groups were at best, 4 inches. And loud? Geez.
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).

Gerard

The fact is that steel fatigues over time under repeated force applied, and that just as with torque, the effect of repeated forceful levering is cumulative. Eventually you'll need to adjust your sights or scope to accommodate bending of the barrel. The degree of bending should be calculable, though of course the inputs would all need to be known quantities as would the exact properties of the steel and the given dimensions such as bore size, barrel diameter, length of the lever arm. An engineer would be able to come up with a simple formula describing how many tens or hundreds of thousands of cocking cycles would be required to reach a 1mm 'droop' at the muzzle, for instance. It's fairly basic engineering stuff really, not myth nor magic, and certainly not urban legend. All metals have fatigue characteristics, and the more force is applied, the sooner a barrel will fatigue and bend.

For relatively obvious examples look at the smallest of the old Webley air pistols, like the Webley Junior in .177". It is very common to see these barrels, which are used as cocking levers, bent significantly, such that a straight edge put along the top shows 0.5mm or even more concavity along the barrel. The result is pellets shooting slightly high in that case, as these are over-cocking air pistols, the breech end grasped and pulled up. The barrels are quite short, but given their very thin dimensions and relatively soft steel they are prone to bending, especially if shooters don't remember to use a smooth, consistent force in doing so, but even with that they eventually bend.

A cocking lever will fatigue just the same. Only it won't matter so much, as a slightly curved cocking lever won't harm point of impact. It may eventually fail to line up properly and thus look bad, but in terms of function that doesn't matter.

spingerpreacher

old guns (webley, or, lol, 100s of thousands of cranks?) and crap guns (anything from umarex).

no wonder i don't see droops. :)


i agree in spirit, still sounds anecdotal.  anyone done any science on break-barrel rifle droop?

spingerpreacher

i killed a legend about the damage of using brass rod-cleaning brushes in airguns.  (IME, there isn't)

i killed the "can't use a bi/tripod with a break-barrel" myth. (we don't need no stinkin' artillery hold)


now i gotta figure a way to bust barrel-droop rumors. (bet it's not as often as folks might think.)  ;)

Alan

I might agree with you, but the second issue in the hinge. A couple of the break barrels use a dove tail sort of shape to make sure the barrel aligns left right, and hopefully vertically too. Nonetheless, if the bolt securing the hinge is loose, alignment will not be secure.

As for the number of rounds fired... I have a one year old FX Impact, Mk III, which just shot up the 30th box of slugs. That's 9,750 shots, or a little over 800 per month. This doesn't include the Impact Mk II I own. If I haven't lost count of the boxes, its total is close 20,000. I do shoot a lot.
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).