Author Topic: 🔴 SHORT Scopes + WIDE FoV + 3-12x / 3-9x Scopes —— Scope Specs Table  (Read 190 times)

JungleShooter

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Scope Specs Table:
SHORT Scopes, and WIDE FoV Scopes,
and 3-12x or 3-9x Scopes
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For those that like to compare the specs of scopes before hitting the "Place in Cart" button — I would be nice if all the specs could be found in one place.


🔶 So, here is another Scope Specs Table — this time comparing the following types of scopes:
▪ SHORT scopes, and
▪ WIDE FoV (Field of View) scopes, and
▪ 3-12x and 3-9x scopes


The attached PDF doc compares about 50 of these types of scopes.


🔶 I narrowed the selection down to scopes that fulfill typical airgun requirements:
▪ 10 yard min. parallax
▪ Holdoff reticle (no BDC, no plain crosshairs)
▪ Exposed turrets
(there are some exceptions)

▪ Divided in SFP and FFP scopes, with FFP separated that lack thick outside posts to guide the eyes at low magnifications


▪ Most scopes are between $200 and $300, all are under $500.



Every airgunner has their own requirements and preferences of what they expect from a scope.
The table format makes it easy to compare the models that fulfill YOURS! 😊


Happy scope shopping! 👍🏼

Matthias



  • Lima, PERU

Alan

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Perhaps all good information, but some of the "red" notations are opinions!

There is nothing wrong with capped turrets. Rather it is a choice, and sometimes the best choice, especially for climatic extremes. And, if you're a reticle user, rather than a knob turner, it doesn't matter. Turn-counter turrets are another debatable issue, for he same reasons. And here's another thought. Capped turrets, besides their weather sealing benefits, are notably shorter in height. If you hunt in high-brush, you'd know why they're perferred.

I might agree about front AO, but they're an advantage (keener focus) if you're a bench shooter. And what about eye-piece focus capability? Are they lockable?

And I find is strange, that there is no mention of sun shades.

As for wire reticles, why are they bad? They're fine for low power scopes, and one could reasonably argue that fact. Higher powers and/or FFP? Obviously etched reticles have an advantage.

Another attribute not mentioned, was busy reticles. Some of the recent additions to airgunning scope models, have such busy reticles, it is difficult to get the correct sight picture quickly. I'd suspect, that the vast majority of scoped weaponry, use capped turrets, simple wires reticles, and no focus capabilities than any of the types listed therein.

« Last Edit: October 09, 2021, 04:22:57 PM by Alan »
  • Roswell, New Mexico
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).

JungleShooter

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🔶
Quote

Really appreciate all your hard work on this, you have a real passion for this kind of thing!

Thank you very much!


➔ This is the text of a PM I just received for a similar post. Thanks to the author for their kind words of appreciation!  😊 




🔶
Some of the "red" notations are opinions!

➔ YES, Alan, that's correct. Like I wrote about the FoV — it's "personal" and "subjective." ✔️



🔶
There is nothing wrong with capped turrets.

➔ Right — if you are holdover-shooter, shoot in extreme climates, or want low turrets because you're in thick brush. ✔️
Since airguns have such steep trajectories the elevation typically needs to be adjusted — either with the reticle or with the turret. These Scope Specs Tables started out to separate scopes that explicitly are made for that. 
And so I put that into the heading of the table — "Exposed Turrets — Holdoff Reticle" — so the table user knows that up front.
Because just like you say, there are shooting scenarios where an airgunner does not want exposed turrets. 😊 




🔶
And what about eye-piece focus capability? Are they lockable?

And I find is strange, that there is no mention of sun shades.

➔ Yeah, good points. ✔️ 
It sure would be nice to have that information included in the table as well. I just could not see to spend any more time on these tables...! 🤣 I guesstimate it's been well 150 hours I've spent assembling them.... 




🔶
Another attribute not mentioned, was busy reticles. Some of the recent additions to airgunning scope models, have such busy reticles, it is difficult to get the correct sight picture quickly.

➔ Those "busy" gridded reticles were cool when they came out — and expensive at the time — and some shooters really like them — they allow for more precise holdovers (if you put in the time).
But others only hold off for windage, and others yet don't like the "business" because it distracts or it clutters their scope cam footage!
So, that's why I decided to add the word "Grid" in column 16 of the table — if the reticle was a "busy" one. 😄 




🔶
I'd suspect, that the vast majority of scoped weaponry use capped turrets, simple wires reticles, and no focus capabilities than any of the types listed therein.

➔ Yes, precisely, Alan! ✔️  You descibe very well one of the reasons I made the Specs Tables...! 😄   
🔹Because after I bought my first scope for an airgun, I learned the hard way that typical airgunners (not all, of course!) might be interesteded in a variety of features or specs that typical powderburners (= the vast majority of scoped weaponry) might have less interest:

▪Springer approved
▪10 yard parallax adjustment
▪Adjustment of POA, either with a holdoff reticle, or with
▪Turrets that are made for frequent dialing (exposed)
▪Large max. elevation adjustment
▪Turret counters
▪Zero stops 
▪FFP or SFP
▪Concordance between turrets and reticle (mil/mil or moa/moa)

So, that's when the Specs Tables were born, to help me navigate the oceans of scopes out there....! 🤣   


🔹After using the Specs Tables to make my first purchase I figured other airgunners might benefit from the many hours of work I had put into them, so I started posting them.  After all: I had benefitted so much from the airgun forums (and still do!) — I wanted to give something back!!

Thank you, Alan, and your team, for giving us the Airgun Guild forum!!  👍🏼👍🏼



Matthias
  • Lima, PERU

Alan

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Thanks Matthias. There are two other items as I think about them.

LIGHTED RETICLES! I put that is upper case for a reason. There are very few real hunters who use their lighted reticles. I have three scope with them now, and two don't have batteries in them! Once upon a time, I had two UTGs, both with 36 color reticles. I did my best to make use of them, and even went out of my way to do so. What a waste of time and energy! Tomfoolery in my opinion!

Perhaps a personal choice... I'm doing my best to use the reticle spacings (FFP) to gauge the distance to target. I've put a lot of effort into it, and it is starting to pay off. My hit rate (mostly on doves and pigeons) started at about 50%, until now which is closer to 90%. I do often check the distance with my laser rangefinder, and am finding the distance to be within my kill window, or about a 2 inch circle on a pigeon. This brings up another point.

All hunters it seems, sight in their weapons at some specific, but arbitrary, distance—say at 100 yards for a firearm, and 50 yards for an airgun. That's fine, if you carry a range chart and/or use a laser rangefinder, depending upon your preference to reticle aiming or knob twisting. But there is a better way!

My impact is tuned to shoot NSA, 26.8 gr. slugs, at 933 FPS. It is sighted in at 82 yards, and for very good reasons. First, it is difficult to get closer to pigeons than about 50 to 60 yards, once they've been shot at a few times. They easily recognize faces, as donning a camo face mask sometimes improved your chances. This sight in distance places me very close to to being within the PBR (point blank range) of the slugs trajectory between 50 yards and about 90 yards. The amount of correction beyond 90 yards, is easier to gather than you might think. If the pigeon is larger than two cross hairs (MOA), you hold under a bit. If it is smaller, you hold over a bit. A bit being about the difference larger or smaller that two MOA. If I do my part, the hit ratio is about 90%. For longer distances, the laser rangefinder is more accurate, if you can get a good reflection from the target. And I have to admit, I'll never be perfect at this, but it is rewarding when making a pigeon kill out to 150 yards without using anything but the reticle!
  • Roswell, New Mexico
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).

JungleShooter

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🔶 Seems like we both have the same main quarry! 👍🏼😄 

I try to add other animals to my hunting list, but I live in a vast rock desert by the ocean, so you can imagine huntable animals go look for better places to live...!
There are only a few crazy critters that tough it out — one of them the human being (at the last census there were 10 million of them crazy things living together all bunched up in a city called Lima)...! 🤣



🔶
There are very few real hunters who use their lighted reticles.

➔ Yeah, I know, for some the lighted reticle question seems to be a very personal issue. Some don't need it, period. Some don't want it (in order to save fractions of an ounce). Some lighted reticles are pretty terrible (the mentioned UTG's 36 variations of shining their light unnecessarily all over the scope image come to mind 🤣).

For me, lighted reticles help me (1) with my FFP scopes to see my reticle better at low magnifications.
(2) And I have needed(!) lighted reticles on various occasions during urban hunting at night. Situations present themselves, often unexpectedly: A warehouse permission at night. An industrial property lit by street lights but large dark areas in between.



🔶
I'm doing my best to use the reticle spacings (FFP) to gauge the distance to target. I've put a lot of effort into it, and it is starting to pay off.
My hit rate (mostly on doves and pigeons) started at about 50%, until now which is closer to 90%.

It is rewarding when making a pigeon kill out to 150 yards without using anything but the reticle!

➔ Now THAT is indeed very cool! Congrats on working so hard to raise your hit probability to such high levels, Alan. 👍🏼👍🏼  I still have a long way to go!! 
I do like FFP reticles and I should start paying attention to the pigeon size ratio for ranging.



🔶
All hunters it seems, sight in their weapons at some specific, but arbitrary, distance — say at 100 yards for a firearm, and 50 yards for an airgun.



➔ I like it how you choose your zero range carefully, based on typical quarry range and on the trajectory of your chosen power/projectile combination. 👍🏼
In the beginning, I started doing the arbitrary thing, just like you said: "50 yards" sounded good, so that's what I did. 😄  Little did I understand about PBR and trajectories....! Thanks to the forums I finally learned a better way! 😊




🔶
My impact is tuned to shoot NSA, 26.8 gr. slugs, at 933 FPS.


➔ That's a terribly nice setup you have there, nice and deadly and exceedingly long range! 😄   3 x 👍🏼


Matthias
« Last Edit: October 10, 2021, 08:18:17 AM by JungleShooter »
  • Lima, PERU