Author Topic: A weighty subject  (Read 67 times)

Alan

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3629
  • Set the example... Don't be one!
    • Mobile Amateur Radio
A weighty subject
« on: February 19, 2021, 06:05:12 AM »
The photo below is from Airguns of Arizona’s web site, and sort of speaks for itself. The one thing that is missing is an air tank, and that issue was covered in the verbiage (https://www.airgunsofarizona.com/hunting/2013/01/ultralight-camp-for-the-airgun-hunter/). But that is not the whole story. The verbiage also mentions its approximate 30 pounds of heft, and this leads us to the subject at hand—weight!

If you weigh a few airguns, no matter the type, you’ll find the average weight is about 7 pounds. A few break barrels weigh as much as 10 pounds, and a few CO2s as little as 5 pounds. Fact is, their basic weigh variations aren’t much different than firearms, but airguns ‘look’ heavier due to bulky shape. For sake of argument, let’s settle on 7 pounds of basic weight.

One often needed accessory is a decent optical scope. If you weigh a few of the various models, you’ll find the average weigh is 1.6 pounds. If we’re speaking of electronic scopes, like the ATN X-Sight, you can figure on about 2.5 pounds. But let’s just say the average is 1.6 pounds and let it go at that.

Most everyone ends up with some sort of bipod for the airgun. Weigh a few of those, and you’ll find them heavier than they look. Most hover around 1.8 pounds, with a few as much as 2.5 pounds!

Things get dicey from here on as we’ll see. For example, few airgunners use slings on a regular basis. If you’re one of those, add in 1.4 pounds for a decent quality one. If you’re into fancy add-ons like adjustable, monopod butt plates, anti-cant levels, and camera setups, you’re looking at adding another 3 pounds! Let’s not forget a range finder at one pound, and perhaps an anemometer at a half pound. And, it isn’t uncommon to carry a half a pound of ammo in your pocket. If you’re Matt Drubber, you have to add in 6 pounds of tripod! Oh! I almost forgot the tank of compressed air in our backpacks! So add in another 7 pounds!

Not everyone has all of the aforementioned accouterments to tote up and down the south forty! But by now, you’re no doubt tired of just reading about the weight we haul around, so let’s get down to the bottom line.

Airgun 7 pounds; Scope 1.6 pounds; Bipod 1.8 pounds; Ranger finder 1 pound; Ammo a .5 pounds; And our air tank 7 pounds. All of this totals 17.3 pounds! And this is just the basics! We could add in a large air tank, gun cases for the other guns we brought along, perhaps a 12 volt compressor, field camera and tripod, shooting bench, enough ammo to last a weekend, and the necessary field rations, and a weighty subject it is!

So the next time you hear someone complaining about weight, tell them to go on a ‘waist loss’ diet, before they buy another airgun!




  • Roswell, New Mexico
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).

Capt45

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 304
  • Weihrauch HW30;Crosman Nitro Venom 22;Crosman 1377
Re: A weighty subject
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2021, 08:40:52 AM »
Enjoyed the article; thanks Alan.
  • Sedan
Weihrauch HW30 .177
Crosman Nitro Venom .22
Crosman Am. Classic 1377

steveoh

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2742
    • Airgun FPE Calculator
Re: A weighty subject
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2021, 11:00:50 AM »
Great article and rebuttal Alan.

I find myself rebelling against heavily outfitted air rifles. 2lb scopes, bipods and other assorted unneeded stuff must come off. I'd like to see a Bugbuster like scope for instance, in better quality, compact and light and with good reticles that extend as far out to the edges of the sight. Fixed scopes are making more sense to me these days.

I really do not like bipods for some reason. Maybe it's because they throw off the balance of an already unbalance rifle such as a Texan or the Citrus, or even a Marauder. Also, it seems like I get less accuracy when using a bipod as opposed to lead shot bag, or lead sled or Steelhead's shooting chair. Maybe it's me.

A bullpup is making more and more sense as the weight is more centered to your body mass instead of sticking out in front of you 3 feet. Much easier to shoulder, and carry.

Doodads and thingamabobs all add weight, and I tire of 12+ pound rifles.

 
  • Benicia, California
Quackenbush .58 Outlaw
Shooting Chairs
Vallejo Ferry Schedule
DAQ .458 LA Outlaw Rifle
Sam Yang 909s .45
Sam Yang Sumatra .25
RWS Diana 350Magnum Compact Pro .22
QB-79 .177
Crosman 1322
Crosman 1377 - HoRodded 10 FPE
Diana Model 27 (childhood airgun)
Tolman Skiff
Airgun Calculator

Alan

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3629
  • Set the example... Don't be one!
    • Mobile Amateur Radio
Re: A weighty subject
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2021, 12:20:42 PM »
I agree with the bipod issue. I have the tank of my Impact with just a rubber cheek pad attached to the bottom. If I need to make a long shot, I rest the rifle on the pad to wherever is handy. If I need a really steady mounting position, I use my British bag.

By the way, I weighted it down with two, one pound divers weights, so it stay put over the edge of the door like shown on the photo. You can't do this here, unless you're on your own deeded land.
« Last Edit: February 19, 2021, 12:22:24 PM by Alan »
  • Roswell, New Mexico
Alan

I have a Hill EC-3000 compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your tank as a courtesy (4,250 PSI limit).