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Topics - Alan

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 12
1
Airgun Optics and Accessories / Living with the X-Sight II Volume Two!
« on: January 17, 2018, 04:40:14 AM »
I've had fun with the X-Sight II for over two years. But as I write this, it is off to Steve(oh), our illustrious Web Master (heavy on the Master!).

Everything I wrote about it before it still true, but a few things have been added. A good example is the Bluetooth function. It does work, but it also add to the battery drain. And speaking of which, there is a following who insist the KentLi batteries are the answer—they are categorically mistaken! AA-sized batteries have a finite current limit, no matter their Ah rating. With the video running (RAV or otherwise), and any other "feature" running, the current draw exceeds their capabilities. This fact makes it mandatory to use the external battery pack. Period!

The another new feature (product?) is the laser ranger finder. Well great! All I need is another "thingy" to carry around. It does talk to the scope, and the scope responds by resetting the POI to agree with the laser-measured distance. I've never owned ATN's laser range finder, but those who have it swear at it. I do too, but for a different reason. Oh, and forget about the remote control button option. It is harder to use than the buttons on the scope!

The X-Sight II has the wonderful ballistic program built in. It is not applicable to airguns, as the minimum distance is 27 yards. But even when using the laser range finder, by the time you get everything setup, the game is long gone! Yes, it is that complicated to use. In my honest opinion, it isn't worth the effort. Ask yourself what MIL dot reticles are for? Not only that, but the firmware doesn't automatically reset the distance to target when it is reset. So when you forget to set the distance the same as the sight in distance, nothing works correctly. Do it right, and the POI is very close to the POA regardless of power. And, speaking of power....

Buy either the 3 to 14 or the 5 to 15, and leave it at the lowest power. Yes, you can zoom in, but remember it is an electrical zoom, not optical! As a result, the closer you zoom in, the more pixelated the image appears. Not the stuff of champions. In fact, it is this really low resolution (compared to an optical scope) which is its greatest failure. But then again, it sells for just $700. What should you expect for $700. Well one thing, is better Customer Service. It is hit and miss at best.

Using the night setting has a few quirks, but using the sun shade at night limits the amount of IR bloom from nearby objects. If it is still a problem, and you're like Steve (shooting from a fixed distance), move the IR source away from your position. Or, using one of the inexpensive units from Amazon. (And Steve, I didn't send my external source-I forgot-but if you need it, let me know. Buy some CR123s for the IR source while you're at it.)

If you're an air gunner (aren't we all) here is some sage advice(s). If at all possible, go to Cabelas or other retailer, and look at the scope. In some cases, it requires a rail extension to place the eyepiece in the correct position. And in most cases, an 11 mm to picatinny adapter, all from China! Limit yourself to the video record (for get the RAV—recoil activated video) feature as it won't work on an airgun. But don't mount it on any airgun with a notable kick, or you'll ruin the scope! If you don't need all of the fun features the X-Sight II offers, look at the Photon. It is cheaper, easier to mount, and most of all, lighter, and more battery friendly.

Lastly, the X-Sight II does what it does, trying to be everything to everyone. And that is, all-around medium to poor performance in every category, except for night vision where it is about a 6 to 8 depending on your individual circumstances.

PS: The next installment of the X-Sight II story will come from Steve!


2
No one here knows me personally, and I can count on one hand the number of members I’ve spoken with. As the new “owner” I think it is fair to give the membership a bit of my back ground.

I am 77 years old, and retired from US WEST Dex. Both my wife Marilyn (a retired phycologist) and I have been married once before. Between us we have six children, thirteen grandchildren, and four great grandchildren.

Hobby wise, I’ve been a licensed amateur radio operator since 1970. My call sign is KØBG. That interest was enhanced by operating from my vehicle, while traveling for my employer. That resulted in my other web site, www.k0bg.com which has been live since 2004.

My interest in hunting and fishing comes from the fact I literally grew up in a sporting goods store in Kansas City, MO. The last of four boys (read that as the baby of the family!), my father doted on me, by taking me everywhere one can imagine to hunt and fish. By the time I was about fourteen, I owned several firearms. One of those was a custom-build 22-250 (then a wildcat), based around an FN Mauser action. That rifle peaked my interest in varmint hunting, a love I still yearn for.

My interest in airguns started about 1950. I can’t tell you what model Benjamin it was, except that it was a .22 caliber, and you pumped it. I’d sure like to have that one back in my hands. Then about 5 years ago, I bought a Crosman PA77, only because the price was right. $49 as I recall. I didn’t do much to it, other than install a red dot scope. I gave it to Monkeydad as he has a use for it.

Afterward, I’ve purchased about ten airguns (more on those later), on the path to learning the ropes so to speak. Some of those airguns, including my favorite  .25 caliber W.A.R. Cobra, came from Travis Whitney. And that fact got me here, on the Guild!

As we all know, Travis Whitney started this web site as a way to share his expert knowledge about all things using compressed air. Along the way, he brought in other experts, almost too numerous to mention. They include, but are not limited to, Steveoh (our dedicated web master, for whom I have great adoration), Bob Sterne, Hajimoto, Shooter1721, and quite obviously, Travis himself! I wish I knew everyone, but alas I am diminished, so please do not feel slighted if I didn’t mention a special someone.

The point of all of this, is an effort on my part to foster more membership and posting activity. I’ve thought of many ways to do so, and one of those is to offer the membership a prize. How they’ll win the prize is still a up in the air (no pun intended), as there are legal entanglements which need to be ironed out. But just to whet one’s appetite, it will be one of the new (soon available) Benjamin Fortitudes. Once we get the details ironed out, there will be an announcement made in the “Items for sale” section of this web site. So please stay tuned.

Besides the help from all of the members, I be remiss if I didn’t mention our sponsors; Marmot Militia, J. S. Air Rifles, Windmeister, Wicked Air Rifles, JBS, and Neil Claque. If I missed anyone, I apologize. I thank each any everyone. May we all learn from one another to the betterment of the hobby.

Alan Applegate

3
OFF TOPIC / New Year's Resolution
« on: December 31, 2017, 03:25:37 PM »
We all have good intentions when it comes to making New Year's Resolutions, but seldom follow through. So... I'll try my best to forgive those folks who never return calls and/or never follow through with a promise. Your results may be differ.

4
Airgun Hunting / The prefect hunting cartoon
« on: December 09, 2017, 02:21:57 AM »
Kudos to my friend Peter who sent this to me.

http://www.bccourier.com/Archives/News_detail.php?contentId=26572

Alan

5
General Airgun Forum Discussion / Gauge Revisit
« on: November 22, 2017, 10:48:47 AM »
Finally got around to taking a photo of the new gauges from Wika. They aren't cheap ($60 delivered each), but they are accurate!!! At least the 6k PSI one is dead on as measured with my Class1 calibrated Wika gauge I paid big bucks for!

The 2k PSI show a bit high in the photo, but this is regulator creep. Its normally set to 1850 PSI.



6
Airgun Ammo / Published BCs of the various pellets
« on: November 10, 2017, 04:57:16 AM »
I was unaware of this "chart", http://www.chronoconnect.com/pellet-list.html, but it does bring up an interesting fact or two. H.A.M. publishes a similar chart, and a few manufacturers publish their own data. However, about half the time the values do not agree with one another. This could be due to variations in the ambient and altitude, obviously. What I'd like to see, is the methodology used to calculate them. Labradar makes it a bit easier (and less costly) for the layman, but doesn't answer how JBS or RWS gets their data?? Anyone know?

7
Airgun Hunting / Pigeon question
« on: October 29, 2017, 04:36:41 PM »
I shot a pigeon this afternoon that was really big. Most around here hover around about 18 to 24 ounces. This one was almost 2 pounds! So how big do they get in your neck of the woods?

8
General Airgun Forum Discussion / Total count since late June
« on: October 05, 2017, 01:52:08 PM »
I thought it might be wise to actually count the empty tins of pellets I've put through the .25 caliber WAR I bought from Travis (rather than guess).

The 20 large tins are mostly Air Arms 25.4 but there are a few JBS in the stacks including one tin of JBS heavies. The Polymag tins are 150 each. That's 7,600 pellets plus what I've shot out of the current tin (≈1/2 the tin). I have never cleaned the barrel, except to wipe down the outside occasionally. All I have done to it was replace a defective o-ring in the regulator, one chamber o-ring, and a tiny bit of lube to the hammer. Better than 3/4 inch groups out to 100 yards if I do my part at the indoor range.





9
General Airgun Forum Discussion / Accurate Gauges
« on: September 27, 2017, 03:31:45 PM »
About a month ago, I ask the group about 23 mm gauges, and where to buy accurate ones. One company I was referred to was Dwyer. Well, I ordered them, and waited 3 weeks or so to get them. The 0/3000 gauge ended up being a 0/4000, and the 0/5000 gauge turned out to be 0/6000! I got an RMA due to the errors. And, they're made in China!

Not daunted, I kept looking, and contacted Wika directly. This, because I found some info on their 111.12 series which are 27 mm. They don't make them as standard model any longer. Ah, gee, now what? After contacting the lovely young lady at Wika, I order the gauges shown below. Yes, they are expensive, but they're Class 4, which means they have an accuracy of ±4% of their range. That I can live with. And, it should be obvious why one would want an accurate gauge, especially on the regulated side if you switch pellet weights occasionally.

I might add, these are as large as you can use on a W.A.R. or similar airguns which have both gauges on one side of the regulator. It is no big deal to reverse the position of the high pressure side gauge to the right side of the bottle adapter/regulator assembly with the Foster fitting. This would allow the use of the next step up which is ≈40 mm, which could be ordered as Class 2. I'm not going to worry about that, as long as these new units work as advertised.

I'll report back once I get them installed about mid November.

Part Number: TBD
Description:
Burdon tube pressure gauge,model 1x1.12.26/27
Type: 111.12
Nominal size: 27 mm
Unit of outer Scale: psi / -inHg
Measuring range: gauge pressure range
Scale range: 0/2000 psi
Process Connection: 1/8"NPT
Case material: bras
Accuracy Class: Class 4.0
Pointer: Plastic, Black
Packing: bulk-packing
Process Connection/Case Surface: blank
Dial: Plastic, White, with Stop Pin
Ingress Protection: Standard
Dial description:
Pressure Gauge Standard: US-Standard
color for 1.scale (outside): black
dial background: White
Manufacturer logo: *WIKA®*
stop pin on dial: at zero
Price: $53.94
Estimated Lead Time: 40-45 working days aro
TP Code: 111.12-K-PG514Z-NHIZZGBZZZ
 
Part Number: TBD
Description:
Burdon tube pressure gauge,model 1x1.12.26/27
Type: 111.12
Nominal size: 27 mm
Unit of outer Scale: psi / -inHg
Measuring range: gauge pressure range
Scale range: 0/6000 psi
Process Connection: 1/8"NPT
Case material: bras
Accuracy Class: Class 4.0
Pointer: Plastic, Black
Packing: bulk-packing
Process Connection/Case Surface: blank
Dial: Plastic, White, with Stop Pin
Ingress Protection: Standard
Dial description:
Pressure Gauge Standard: US-Standard
color for 1.scale (outside): black
dial background: White
Manufacturer logo: *WIKA®*
stop pin on dial: at zero
Price: $53.94
Estimated Lead Time: 40-45 working days aro
TP Code: 111.12-K-PG541Z-NHIZZGBZZZ

10
OFF TOPIC / Wrong vernacular
« on: September 22, 2017, 10:40:52 AM »
Mr. Nielsen of swaged bullet fame and fortune, used the term firing in one of his recent posts. As in firing ones gun, but the term directly relates to discharging a firearm, hence the root meaning of the term. If we are to follow the same rules of speech, then when we discharge an airgun we must be airing! Sure makes me wonder.

11
General Airgun Forum Discussion / Common issues
« on: September 19, 2017, 06:10:21 AM »
In the last three or so years, I have read numerous posts about one specific brand of airgun, specific models notwithstanding. It seems that after a few hundred shots, the accuracy diminishes and/or the trigger starts acting up. In the latter case, about half the time, the airgun won't cock properly. To me, this is a severe safety issue! And, it seems the airgun in question also needs to be cleaned regularly to maintain accuracy. Neither of these issues seems to plaque other makes!

I purchased an airgun from Travis (OldPro) in June of this year. I've shot ≈7 tins (almost 2,500 rounds) through it. I haven't had one single issue with the trigger (it is a Timney after all), and I've never cleaned the barrel! Yet, it shoots just like it did when I received it—less than 3/4 inch groups at 75 yards with me on the other end! And, I haven't had issues with the bottled and regulated Marauder I bought from him a couple of years ago. This after nearly 10,000 rounds without cleaning or plating with the trigger adjustment!

It seems to me, that some airguns just aren't up to their hyped position in the marketplace. Which, of course, makes me wonder why anyone would buy a trouble-prone, and unsafe airgun?

12
Airgun Ammo / I wonder
« on: September 14, 2017, 05:17:41 AM »
Hard Air Magazine reviewed the RWS Superdome 14.5 grain, .22 caliber pellets, replete with photos. http://hardairmagazine.com/reviews/rws-superdome-14-5-grain-22-caliber-pellet-test-review/

While looking at the photo of the pellet, one quickly realizes the imperfections in the surface, which are qualified by the included chart. The chart show a ±12% variation in weight and length, yet they called these pellets, at 4¢ each, "premium" quality! I don't think so!

Makes me wonder how good pellets COULD be if we were willing to pay more of each pellet? Personally, I'd gladly pay several times this much if I could get variations down to say ±2%. And don't you wish they could control the variations as close as jacket bullets are controller nowadays? Geez! This is the 21st Century, after all.

13
OFF TOPIC / OpEd
« on: September 08, 2017, 06:45:40 AM »
Opinions are like noses…. Everybody has one, and all too often they stick them into other’s businesses. I’ll try and not do that here.

Place your mindset back about 60 years or so, even if you’re not that old. Seemingly, every kid on the block had a BB gun, or at least wanted one. If you were really lucky, you had a pellet gun, and were the envy of the neighborhood—at least in your cadre of friends because parents didn’t always agree on the need. But parents did recognize the difference between pellet guns and real ones (.22 rimfires for example), and the need for parental guidance difference on same. Apparently, this mindset is all but gone!

Nowadays, a gun is a gun, and it doesn’t make any difference what powers it! You’re either on one side of the fence or the other, and there is no in-between stance by anybody of conscience. We can blame the political climate we all live in if we choose, but I believe the truth lies elsewhere. Here is an example.

UMAREX, a major supplier of airguns, lists 65 different models of CO2-powered handgun clones on their web site. Most of these are indistinguishable from the real thing. In fact, they’re made so close to reality, that some of them use a cartridge-type loading system! While not as powerful as the real McCoy, few people could tell the difference especially so when one is pointed at them during a robbery. Incidentally, it is this nefarious use, which, in part, caused Canadian authorities to ban their import and sale, and Canada is not alone in their mindset!

Another example is the current rage of using large-caliber, cast bullets (rather than pellets) in airguns designed to effectively use them. This has allowed airguns to become as powerful as some lesser, real firearms! Indeed, some states even allow their use in taking at least deer-size game. Begs the question… Are jacketed bullets next?

Let’s face another fact. It is against the law for a felon to own a firearm. Doesn’t always stop them from doing so, even in face of extended federal sentencing guidelines. But in most cities and states, they don’t need a background check to buy an airgun! We know from FBI records that airgun ownership is an increasing trend among convicted felons. And they’re using them like real firearms during the commission of felonies!

The main point herein is simply this; The mindset among the general public is becoming even more anti-gun, and it doesn’t make much difference what powers the projectile they discharge. Adding insult to injury, the public mindset also has the term silencer burned into their conscience (thanks to Hiram Percy Maxim), no matter our efforts to call them by a more appropriate name. But who is to blame?

Well, I believe Walt Kelly, the artist who penned the comic strip Pogo, said it best… “We have met the enemy and he is us."

15
Airgun Hunting / How hard are they?
« on: August 24, 2017, 03:04:20 PM »
I have always been a bit skeptical of the hardness of Air Arms' (and JSB) 25.4 grain pellets. I keep hearing how soft they are, but unless I've hit something solid, they never seem to flatten out even a little. Well, not today!

The photos are of a Eurasian dove at 62 yards according to my range finder. He was sitting atop a utility pole. The first photo is the entrance wound, and I'm surprised it was as big as it was. If I had to guess, it was about a .30 caliber hole. I suspect the pellet took some feathers, flesh, etc. with it, making the hole bigger.

The second photo is the exit wound. The photo doesn't do it justice, as it is about 1/2 inch, and was rather fleshy to use a euphemism.

I didn't take photos of the dissection (yes I wore gloves), but the pellet got both lungs, clipped the liver, and blew the heart nearly in two pieces. Maybe a lucky shot, but the pellet did its job, because the dove just fell down, period!


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