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Author Topic: Is it me, or what?  (Read 317 times)

Alan

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Is it me, or what?
« on: July 24, 2017, 05:54:57 AM »
All weaponry, no matter its style or form, has some issue which could be changed to make it better. Just look what the compound bow accomplished vs. the long bow. The same can be said for the airgun arena. We've overcome air leaks for the most part, designed better valves, conquered hammer bounce, and forged new barrel types (pun intended). But if there is one issue which seems to still be with us, is poor trigger design.

The Cobra I bought from Travis doesn't have any trigger issues, because it is equipped with a Timney Elite, two stage trigger assembly. It's as close to perfection as one can get. But this raises a serious question—why haven't other manufactures gotten the message? There is one glaring example everyone knows about. When their trigger assembly works, it is admired by their owners, but when it doesn't, it typically involves a trip back to the dealer (read that as expensive!). Perusing over just three airgun web sites, turned up over 50 examples of trigger malfunctioning from the one manufacturer. To me, that's really scary!

I'm just wondering how wide spread poor airgun trigger design is. What's your take?


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Alan

I have an Omega compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your portable tank as a courtesy.

bnowlin

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Re: Is it me, or what?
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2017, 09:09:41 AM »
Alan,
I still believe my old saying "send it to the consumer for final assembly and testing".  Most manufacturers of a product gamble on selling something to a customer that doesn't know squat so they make money on that product cause the folks don't know to complain and just keep on using the product, unless it just doesn't  work at all.  Along comes the good repair guys that fix most problems with out dealer knowledge.  So the manufacturers/dealers make money on that.  Its an endless circle.  Then you have the guys that just gamble that it will work enough till the warranty runs out or the customer just sells it to get rid of it.  It's not just air guns it is almost every product sold.  One big gamble both ways with the manufacturer/dealer winning the biggest portion of  the time.  So to heck with the consumer.  Then we have a couple of very good forums that have very good people to help or keep us out of big jams.  My vent for the day.  And then you find the folks tha insist on buying CHEAP, not inexpensive but Cheap and there is a difference.>:(
Bob
« Last Edit: July 24, 2017, 09:16:30 AM by bnowlin »

Alan

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Re: Is it me, or what?
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2017, 09:58:46 AM »
Yes there is!

Thankfully, folks like Travis Whitney and Jim Gaska, are willing to step up to the plate for us folks who don't own a machine shop! And I've also got to hand it to folks like Bob Sterne, you, and a few dozen more who don't mind getting their feet wet.
  • Roswell, New Mexico
Alan

I have an Omega compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your portable tank as a courtesy.

Gerard

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Re: Is it me, or what?
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2017, 03:22:31 PM »
One my first girlfriend's most angry reasons for leaving me was that I had to modify everything. Didn't matter what sort of product, I always found fault with, then improved upon some aspect of functionality or reliability. Drove her nuts. My wife appreciates this aspect of my personality. She doesn't generally want to listen to explanations of exactly how I make things work better, but she loves the results, so it's all good. Airguns are no exception. Even my $2000 Pardini K12 pistol was such a case. The K12 trigger is legendary, perfection, but the grip didn't even remotely fit me. Carving grips on competition pistols is if course common practice, but even at size large it wasn't big enough, so I made a new one. Fits like a glove. Absolutely stable and comfy. That grip won me a few medals at the provincial level. Well... that and a LOT of hours of practice. Modifying myself, as it were.
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Christopher

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Re: Is it me, or what?
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2017, 04:28:47 PM »
Alan's quote
Quote
why haven't other manufactures gotten the message?

IMO it's a cultural mentality. We live in a consumer driven economy that has one goal: sell, sell, sell. Products that are of heirloom quality are bad for that business model. My aunt, who is now passed, grew up in the Depression, went to college in the forties and later for her Masters in the fifties. She told me one time that in her economics class, that the concept of obsolescence was being taught. She was a very thrifty person who grew up in a, dare I say, "thrifty" time and was utterly appalled by the idea. In other words, we can make stuff to tear up and that will increase business.....Now I'm not purporting that this is the model for most airgun brands, but that ideology has impacted quality in this society. Thankfully, there are still folks out there that want to produce quality and take great pride in a job well done.  WAR and AAA are exemplary models of top shelf products made right here at home. But the majority look at one thing, and that's the price tag. In my line of work, construction, there's a saying "skilled labor isn't cheap and cheap labor isn't skilled"

Soapbox speech ended,
Chris
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bnowlin

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Re: Is it me, or what?
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2017, 04:39:15 PM »
Alan's quote
Quote
why haven't other manufactures gotten the message?

IMO it's a cultural mentality. We live in a consumer driven economy that has one goal: sell, sell, sell. Products that are of heirloom quality are bad for that business model. My aunt, who is now passed, grew up in the Depression, went to college in the forties and later for her Masters in the fifties. She told me one time that in her economics class, that the concept of obsolescence was being taught. She was a very thrifty person who grew up in a, dare I say, "thrifty" time and was utterly appalled by the idea. In other words, we can make stuff to tear up and that will increase business.....Now I'm not purporting that this is the model for most airgun brands, but that ideology has impacted quality in this society. Thankfully, there are still folks out there that want to produce quality and take great pride in a job well done.  WAR and AAA are exemplary models of top shelf products made right here at home. But the majority look at one thing, and that's the price tag. In my line of work, construction, there's a saying "skilled labor isn't cheap and cheap labor isn't skilled"

Soapbox speech ended,
Chris

I totally agree. 
Bob