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Author Topic: Common issues  (Read 206 times)

Alan

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Common issues
« on: September 19, 2017, 06:10:21 AM »
In the last three or so years, I have read numerous posts about one specific brand of airgun, specific models notwithstanding. It seems that after a few hundred shots, the accuracy diminishes and/or the trigger starts acting up. In the latter case, about half the time, the airgun won't cock properly. To me, this is a severe safety issue! And, it seems the airgun in question also needs to be cleaned regularly to maintain accuracy. Neither of these issues seems to plaque other makes!

I purchased an airgun from Travis (OldPro) in June of this year. I've shot ≈7 tins (almost 2,500 rounds) through it. I haven't had one single issue with the trigger (it is a Timney after all), and I've never cleaned the barrel! Yet, it shoots just like it did when I received it—less than 3/4 inch groups at 75 yards with me on the other end! And, I haven't had issues with the bottled and regulated Marauder I bought from him a couple of years ago. This after nearly 10,000 rounds without cleaning or plating with the trigger adjustment!

It seems to me, that some airguns just aren't up to their hyped position in the marketplace. Which, of course, makes me wonder why anyone would buy a trouble-prone, and unsafe airgun?


  • Roswell, New Mexico
Alan

I have an Omega compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your portable tank as a courtesy.

Steelhead

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Re: Common issues
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2017, 08:00:43 AM »
"Which of course, makes me wonder why anyone would buy a trouble-prone and unsafe airgun?"

You needn't have to wonder...I can tell you why. Hype, b.s., videos, and reviews posted by people who have a vested interest in whether you purchase the product or not. The situation is as clear as day.

The only way you can learn and understand the pitfalls is through experience. Just like any other hobby, there is a learning curve and that curve for air guns is steep. How is one supposed to make rational decisions when the all you really have to base those decisions on is marketing and opinions?

As you probably know, I got into PCP this year. I looked, read, watched, and absorbed info for hours and hours and hours. I ended up purchasing an Airforce Texan advertised as the 'world's most powerful air gun'  for my first PCP. After seeing all of the info I was so excited to get it I could barely stand it. I was expecting something that shot really good groups at 100 yards and figured with some practice I could extend that out. While the gun is fun to shoot, it's so inconsistent that I'm afraid to take it out hunting because I have no idea where the projectile is going to go. Granted, both the gun and the shooter are new, but it does not stand up to the hype. It's scarcely three months old and the cocking lever is already broken and the air tank won't stay tight. This is not to say that it's not a good product, but it certainly is giving me cause for concern.

Not everyone is an engineer, machinist, or an expert on the hobby and so of course we fall victim to the fluff and b.s. of expertly marketed stuff. No matter how much research you do, if you don't have first hand knowledge you will always be taking a risk.

I don't want to ramble, but reading your post touched a nerve. It's hard trying to make good decisions on purchasing expensive things when it seems like every person thinks that 'their' setup is the cat's ass and everything else pales. Nothing's worse than dropping two grand and second guessing your decision or hearing the proverbial 'why'd you do that?'

What I like about this forum is that I can feel comfortable asking questions that 9 out of 10 people here already know without being made to feel like an idiot. We all have to start somewhere. Not to ruffle your feathers, but if an air gun is trouble-prone and unsafe, why not just say what it is and save a guy like me from potentially making a mistake? The irony is that you wonder why anyone would buy it, but won't say what it is. Is that because of a policy of not saying anything bad about brands? Offending someone who may own it? Personally as a newcomer I would like to know because I don't want an unsafe/unreliable gun, especially if the opinion is based on experience and fact. I think that's just good business, not disparaging a brand. If the manufacturer doesn't like hearing about subpar workmanship or engineering, then maybe they'll fix it.

Kevin
  • Petaluma, CA
Airforce Texan .308
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Alan

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Re: Common issues
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2017, 08:34:46 AM »
The reason I didn't mention the manufacturer's name, as it would also identify the site which appears to be dedicated to the brand (for whatever reason).

I agree with your scenario, but only to a point. Most folks who are going to spend over $1,500 for any "thingy" are going to do at least a modicum of research. I did, and yes, I still made a few decisions that I wouldn't make today. One brand I skipped was the one in question, and for the exact reasons I mentioned.

And, you mentioned the Texan. One of the guys here I occasionally shoot with has one in .30 caliber. It seems to shoot very well out to at least 75 yards, consistently. My only fault with it has to do with the muzzle report it makes. To say it is loud, is an understatement. But it doesn't have trigger issues, nor does it need cleaning after 100 rounds!
  • Roswell, New Mexico
Alan

I have an Omega compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your portable tank as a courtesy.

Shorty

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Re: Common issues
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2017, 02:01:17 PM »
Too me, this is a really great topic. I truly hate fluff and hype.

I got started with a gamo bone collector in 22 5 years ago. So much good advertising from this gun ( I thought ). Boy did that thing suck. Couldn't hit crap and blew the scope twice. Moved over to the benjamin trail np and it was great for the first couple weeks then took a dump with a bad piston. That's when I understood that "custom" work is needed on these factory built guns.

Moved over to the 22 synrod and thought that was the cats meow. That lasted about 6 months until it started throwing fliers. Re-designed the hammer spring, got it shooting better by re-crowning and re-choking the barrel. Thought the gun was now a science project and converted it to .357 cal. That was fun but then changed everything back to .22 and regulated it.

It goes on and on.

I am not into purchasing a 1500 dollar gun to shot at 50 to 100 yards now. I know (after 5 years of this stuff) that it comes down to just a few things. Quality, customer service, "research" multiple reviews, and plain ole trust.

The great thing is when a tuner says,does, and tests your gun to YOUR specifications, you receive that particular gun exactly the way you asked it to perform. And, doesn't ignore you when there is a problem.
  • Palm Coast Florida