Author Topic: Varmint Hunting In Extreme Heat (written pictorial)  (Read 415 times)

Crosman999

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Varmint Hunting In Extreme Heat (written pictorial)
« on: August 03, 2018, 10:35:17 PM »
Thursday morning we left the house and drove several hours into the remote mountains of Southern California. Terry and I set up in a location away from our campsite to check zero on our Air Rifles and to scout several new areas for hunting Ground Squirrels. The temperature was in the high 80’s so the new EZ-UP helped immensely in keeping us cool.



Terry and I set up targets out to 100 yards and were happy to have zero wind that is a rarity in this part of the valley floor. We had a great time shooting both the EVOL .30 and the .22 Tapian Mutant Bullpup, both amazingly accurate Air Rifles.


American Air Arms EVOL .30 with DonnyFL Ronin Moderator

After some practice with the rifles we packed up and headed down the road to a spot I had previously seen some Ground Squirrel activity. By this time it was the middle of the day and the temperature was rising into the 90’s making hiking around a bit unpleasant.


Terry making his way back to the Jeep with is Tapian Mutant

After about a half hour of looking for Ground Squirrels we packed the guns up and headed about another 14 miles into the mountains to around 5,300 ft elevation. We had chosen this location as it would be cooler with many Ponderosa Pines that were nestled throughout the vast canyon. The area too had several creeks that are fed by natural springs where Marley could swim and play.



I was quick to set up camp as well as the new EZ-Up canopy, that thing is an absolute necessity on trips like this. The Jeep was loaded with several coolers packed with water, ice and plenty of food for the several days in the wilderness. Ater setting up camp we set out down a nearby trail that followed the creek and gave some shade from the scorching Summer heat.



  The terrain was quite rugged and in some areas was near impossible to cross over the creek due to the steep embankments. I found an area overlooking the creek where I had spotted several Ground Squirrels moving from the many holes and fallen trees.


One of the Ground Squirrel holes at 55 yards

I sat for awhile and spotted several Ground Squirrels going in and out of this hole, made a shot on one of them and missed. After making a poor shot i knew I would have to wait for a while before one would pop back out again. Within about 15 min one decided to show itself again where it was met with a 44gr JSB.



I moved a bit further up the hill as I could hear the distant bark of several more Ground Squirrels moving about around the many fallen trees. I spotted one standing on a fallen log just down the hill overlooking the creeks embankment at 68 yards.





The angle I had to shoot from was a bit awkward to work with as well as having to move my cameras tripod legs to keep upright. The shot was a bit low and made a gut shot sending the Ground Squirrel flying backwards. Almost immediately after I spotted another Ground Squirrel barking high up on a fallen log to my right at 83 yards.



 I took the shot on this one and hit just low sending a chunk of wood right into him, the heat was really getting to me and the sweat in my eyes was making it difficult to see well. I could hear Terry making several shots so went to meet up with him, together we hiked down next to the creek to try and get cool.



Marley and I were perfectly happy staying down by the creek and not moving around much, we sat for awhile and spotted several Ground Squirrels moving around the embankments. We were able to connect with several of them although most were on the run. This was such a beautiful place to hunt despite the brutal Summer heat, was happy to just be able to get out and enjoy. Later that evening the plan was to try finding some Cottontail rabbits that may be moving about and to hopefully cook that evening. We made way back to the camp where we set up some targets along with a steel plate at 125 yards.






Terry’s Tapian Mutant .22

After dragging that heavy steel swing target out to 125 yards I took a break for awhile before shooting again. I watched Terry do some 100 yard practice before getting on it with the EVOL .30, the wind conditions were nice and predictable for late afternoon. After a few shots I was getting amazing groups with my gun at the shorter ranges and finally decided to move out to the 125 yard steel.



I put 3 shots in a nice 1″1/2 cluster and think with better setup such as bags I could have done much better. Shooting like this really makes me appreciate how far modern PCP’s have come. Later that evening after we had rested a bit we took a walk around near the campsite searching for Cottontail rabbits. I had seen plenty of droppings as well as tracks but no movement at all, I think the heat has made them resort to coming out after sundown. After Marley and I took our stroll looking for bunnies we came back to camp and decided to cook up some chicken for an early dinner.



The moon was near full that night and was thankfully much cooler making things much more bearable and relaxing.





That next morning my plan was to wake up early before the sun came up although I slept so well that I didn’t awake till around 6:15am. Terry had already been gone when I woke up so Marley and I ventured away from camp about 3/4 of a mile to a big open field, perfect area to spot both Cottontails and Jackrabbits.



I decided to hike up the barron hillside and work my way around looking for movement in the large open fields. Hunting this type of terrain on flat ground is difficult and usually never works well without a shotgun. Marley and I spotted several Jackrabbits moving up the hillsides at some 200+ yards away but nothing within reasonable range for and Air Rifle. By this time it was apparent that the day was going to be another scorcher, already had my jacket off by 6:45. Marley and I picked a spot in the small amount of shade next to a bush and waited near 20 minutes before we spotted several large Jackrabbit moving in the field at close to 100 yards. I took a shoulder shot on one that sent it running up the hillside before collapsing, the second one was at 98 yards just next to a bush. The Jackrabbit gave me a nice side profile to line up for a perfect headshot that sent it into a flip. Marley ran to recover as it was wildly flipping all over causing a huge dust cloud. I went and recovered the first and met up with Marley where she had recovered the second large Jackrabbit.


American Air Arms EVOL .30 at 85 fpe



Marley and I were both happy our patience had paid off and were able to get two huge Jackrabbits within several seconds of one another. We took a break before throwing them into the pack and heading back to the campsite where Tom from American Air Arms would be showing up to spend the day. As marley and I hiked back we spotted several deer as well as many chipmunks moving about near the creekbed. This area is loaded with larger animals such as Deer, Coyote, Bobcat, Mountain Lion as well as many types of birds.





We made way back to camp where Tom had just arrived just in time for the heat to really become overbearing at 90 degrees by 8:30am. Tom had brought a new Air Rifle he has created that shoots a 27gr .22 slug putting out 60+fpe, he spent some time shooting that against a small 2″ spinner at 125 yards just under the steel plate. Enclosed is a previous photograph of the rifle, we will take a more in depth look at this very advanced Air Rifle in our next article.


American Air Arms EVOL TAC .22 High Power



After our shooting session at camp we all headed back out to seek out some Ground Squirrel action, I headed East following the creek the other direction. Marley and I crossed to the other side of the creek and set up just under the shade of a large Pine tree.



This looked to be a great location and offered a great unobstructed view in near all directions of the large area. To our right as well as in front of us were huge fallen trees that had Ground Squirrel holes all around them. I spotted several Chipmunks running back and forth from one tree to the next as well as the several periodic Ground Squirrel barks. I took a shot at several of the Chipmunks that were sitting on a root from one of the Pine trees next to the creek. These shots were all around 30 yards, close range shots that required some hold-under for once.



After a few minutes I spotted a fairly large Ground Squirrel sticking it’s head up from behind a log at 115 yards.



I made the shot a bit high and it came down right on the back of his head drilling him right into the ground behind the fallen tree.



This area looked to have a large population but I think the heat had kept most of them in the Ground as it was well up to 100 degrees out. I can’t stress enough how important it is to carry a large amount of water, more than you think you need. This environment dehydrates you so quickly that heat exhaustion can happen very easily. When we are out in the wilderness like this, nobody will find you and when they do you just may be dead. With Marley I have to be especially careful about making sure she has enough water as well as keeping my eyes open for Rattlesnakes. Having her bit by a venomous snake is one of my worst nightmares, miles from any type of help. After sitting for about 20 more minutes with no action we looped around back towards camp following the other side of the creek. As we moved through the tall Ponderosa Pines I could see a Ground Squirrel in the distance moving about on a huge fallen tree. I set up the camera the best I could and tried to follow it with the lens while trying to set up the range and gun at the same time, very frustrating. The Ground Squirrel was at 68 yards but moving further up this fallen log.





I made the shot that finally ended at 73 yards sending the 44gr JSB right into his back sending up a cloud of dust as it smacked. The past two days were a great time spent with friends but the heat made moving around quite miserable. Marley and I continued back to camp where it by this time was around 12:30pm, we packed the Jeep and waited for Tom to get back before heading out. This was a slow few days of hunting but was very happy with how well it turned out considering how hot it was. As I’m writing this we are already planning for the next trip, can’t wait to share. Enclosed is the video of our adventures, hope you enjoy and will help us by subscribing.



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Alan

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Re: Varmint Hunting In Extreme Heat (written pictorial)
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2018, 04:11:24 AM »
Good shooting. I wish we had ground squirrels here, but we do not. Pigeons and collared doves are the main quarry, with a few fox, coyote, and skunk added for pleasure.
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Alan

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Hajimoto

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Re: Varmint Hunting In Extreme Heat (written pictorial)
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2018, 02:30:15 AM »
Very enjoyable read. Love the read and images, awesome shooting as usual.
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Knife

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Re: Varmint Hunting In Extreme Heat (written pictorial)
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2018, 12:08:29 PM »
Enjoyed the wright up!

No ground squirrels or chipmunks here. Wish there were. Mostly go after red squirrels, cottontail coon, o'possum and rattlesnakes.

We use to hunt Jacks. All gone now in most of Central Texas.

I miss seeing them. On the rare occasion I do, I won't shoot one. You see, no one told us back in the day that the Jacks actively hunt and kill rattlers. If we has only known!

Had a rattle hiding under my front step to the house last month. almost stepped on his head.

Not only are jacks helpful, no one that I know would eat one, so what is the point, other than to just sill for killing sake?

I guess I see things differently. Being half Cherokee, it goes against everything I have been taught, and believe. Helpful animals are a blessing given to us. Not to be abused is our faith.

Knife
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Alan

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Re: Varmint Hunting In Extreme Heat (written pictorial)
« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2018, 01:07:58 PM »
I've never heard of a jack rabbit killing, much less eating, a rattler. They are, after all, herbivores. Fact is, jack rabbits (hares actually) are a major source of protein for rattlers, especial on the open planes of the American west.

On the other hand, horses, antelope, and other ruminants will kill, but not eat rattlers. Feral pigs, however, have been observed killing and eating rattlers. And just about anything else, for that matter!
  • Roswell, New Mexico
Alan

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Crosman999

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Re: Varmint Hunting In Extreme Heat (written pictorial)
« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2018, 09:25:03 PM »
Thanks for all the kind words, plenty of Ground Squirrels here, some places overrun with them. I have spent a ton of time in the field and have studied Jackrabbits habits, habitat and have never seen one kill a rattlesnake. I have seen a rattlesnake kill a Jackrabbit though, when Jackrabbits are in distress they will thump hind legs on ground and kick. Usually when they get attacked by predators or birds of prey they will kick back legs up. I have seen coyotes get seriously injured by this as those sharp rear claws cut like a razor. Some don't prefer the taste of the meat but I have found nothing wrong with them, backstraps are my favorite. Some of the larger hares during winter months have good amount of meat, much more than a Cottontail. They taste great in stew and sometime I want to try making some jerky. Jackrabbit Jerky lol
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