The AirGun Guild

General Category => Break Barrel, Pumper and Springer Airguns => Topic started by: bforester1982 on December 14, 2017, 07:59:56 PM

Title: Break Barrel
Post by: bforester1982 on December 14, 2017, 07:59:56 PM
Looking at getting my son a gamo for xmas. He's 8. Which one would be best? I'll probably have to cock it for him so I'm Not worried about that. I just want to be sure he can shoulder it and shoot comfortably. Thanks for yals opinions.
Title: Re: Break Barrel
Post by: Alan on December 15, 2017, 04:28:58 AM
You didn't ask, but...

I have owned two, nitro piston break barrels, and I couldn't get either one to shoot worth beans. They're difficult to cock as you noted, but they're even harder to hold properly. If it were me, I'd buy either a pump gun (Benjamin 397 or 392), or one of the good springers (non nitro piston) preferably with a side or bottom cocking level.
Title: Re: Break Barrel
Post by: Steelhead on December 15, 2017, 07:07:29 AM
I bought a regular ol' Benjamin Prowler last year and I couldn't be happier with it. Regardless of the price, I found it to be plenty accurate for a backyard plinker. For a starter gun that teaches safety and marksmanship it fits the bill nicely. Of course there are other nicer/more powerful/accurate guns out there but they also cost more as well.

If the young fella is like any of the rest of us, he will love and cherish it just as we did when we kids. I still have a fond place in my heart for my old Daisy 1894 BB gun that wasn't worth a hill of beans. It's because it was MINE and I learned to shoot it as good as it could be shot.
Title: Re: Break Barrel
Post by: caniborrowsomeammo on December 15, 2017, 10:38:41 PM
1894 Daisy was my first too. Fun, easy to cock, stock fits a kid, I must have killed a million birds in the prune orchard with it.
BB's are cheap and trigger time helps shooting skills. Also, a single shot at that age is kinda boring if you can't keep him occupied shooting. Think attention span. Way more fun to shoot a tin can 10 times by just cocking and shooting vs. loading a pellet at a time.
Don't know what is comparable to the Daisy nowadays.
I got my daughter a 105 Daisy when she was 6 or 7, she's a fine shot with a rife and a pistol at the ripe old age of 27..maybe outshoot me, maybe. ::)