Author Topic: Update on Texan, home range, borescopes, and stuff learned  (Read 509 times)

Steelhead

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Update on Texan, home range, borescopes, and stuff learned
« on: December 13, 2017, 08:36:57 AM »
Happy Holidays to all, first and most important. The last year has been an air gun whirlwind for me. I started the year with nothing but a Benjamin Prowler and I'm finishing the year with a .308 Texan, a .25 Armada, a compressor, and all of the associated goodies. It has been a series of successes, failures, accomplishments and frustrations.

The Texan in particular is a fickle girl. The power and range is awesome, however landing on the perfect combination to achieve it is like finding a needle in a haystack. The biggest factor I have found is the lead fouling. This is compounded by the fact the removing the barrel not an easy task since I've installed the Mad Dag stock. I also did a slight bit of damage (started to cross-thread) to the front screw port on the chassis when installing the stock so I don't want to keep removing it. So cleaning has to be done through the muzzle. I was able to borrow a friend's Hawkeye borescope to inspect the barrel and that was a revelation. If any of you have never used or seen this, it's truly an amazing piece of equipment. I immediately identified that despite my initial cleaning efforts I was still fouled. After using a lead remover/brass brush/copper wool combo the barrel is squeaky clean and now I know what I have to do to maintain it. If anyone ever questions whether or not they may have a fouling issue on their big bore, I would say it is 100% worth it to pay a gunsmith to take a look so you can at least know with confidence what you're dealing with. I made a ton of changes and spent a lot of time/money/aggravation trying to achieve results when my problem was simply fouling.

Because I've shot a variety of ammo (swaged, cast, round balls) it's hard to tell what causes fouling the most. My guess is the round balls. They fly extremely fast (as evidenced by the .22-like 'crack' when breaking the sound barrier) and I think that's the main culprit. I've shelved all round balls and I just use them now as extremely expensive slingshot ammo.

The Armada is just an awesome turnkey gun. Mike did an amazing job on it and it's a tack driver.

With the help of a buddy who's a welder, I've been steadily updating 'the range'. My back yard has multiple (I've lost count now) steel targets from 50 to 200+ yards. Round stationary, round and flat swinging, different sizes, etc.  Of course I also have a couple of moveable target stands for paper as well, but nothing matches to resounding bong of steel. It's great fun and allows me to shoot whenever and as long as I want. I can accommodate guests so whenever any Guild members feel the itch to launch some lead, feel free to drop me a line.

Again, Happy Holidays to all. No one of us knows more than all of us.

Kevin



  • Petaluma, CA
Airforce Texan .308
Benjamin Armada .25
Benjamin Prowler .177
Air Venturi compressor

dreuf

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Re: Update on Texan, home range, borescopes, and stuff learned
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2017, 04:03:06 AM »
Very nice year for you.

So after solving your fouling issue on the 308 texan what are your long range accuracy results now ?

I am still keeping an eye on this gun for 200-300 yards paper punching but feedbacks on accuracy are not very good.

Thanks for your work and feedback


Steelhead

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Re: Update on Texan, home range, borescopes, and stuff learned
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2017, 05:37:57 AM »
Dreuf,

My best groupings at 200 yards thus far have been at about 4" to 5". That being said I will often get two or three touching with a couple of 'fliers' that open the pattern. It should also be noted that I absolutely had various stages of lead fouling during the process.  Now that my bore is completely de-leaded it will be interesting to see how much better the groups are. I'm just waiting on a ammo delivery so I can use the optimal stuff and not my heavier bullets; I want a clean slate with the good stuff to see what results I get.

My gun likes slugs between 118 gr. and 134 gr. at 2500 psi tethered. If you are considering the Texan as a bench gun (which is good since mine is almost 12 lbs. with scope/stock/bipod)  I would recommend getting a Mad Dog stock. It made the gun much more accurate, comfortable to shoot, and lowers the sight line of the scope (no need for expensive rail adapters)

I have my scoped zeroed at about 175 yards right now. I sort of backed into that setting trying to get 154 grain slugs to group. When I switched over to the lighter/faster bullets I found that were consistently accurate at all ranges and I was zeroed at 175. Instead of lowering the elevation I started using my upper mil dots for closer shots and just that simple thing has extended my usable scope range by a lot. At this time I'm not into tilting my scope for extreme range. While I haven't tried 300 yet, I'm absolutely going to now, knowing that I can stay on top of my leading issue. 300 yards may max out my scope...we'll see. 

I honestly think that a lot of the Texans accuracy issues are due to barrel fouling. Since I've eliminated a lot of my variables (added the stock to stiffen the frame, bought the compressor so that my external air source is always at optimum pressure, narrowed down my ammo choices, becoming a better marksman, etc.) it has come down to the bore being the main culprit. Last week the big indicator that I was getting fouling was that I started to get vertical stringing while tethered which morphed into left and right as well. I had seen this before and mistakenly started to blame air pressure, power wheel, scope, bipod, blah-blah-blah. Inconsistency seems to a universal trend with Texans, but I wholeheartedly think that the issue is 99% leaded barrels. I used a bore snake often but that just doesn't cut it IMO. A machinist buddy is making me a plastic jig/guide for the muzzle to protect my crown when cleaning with a rod/brush/jag.

Below is a pic of a typical group. This is 155 yards with three touching and two 'others'. This is what gives me the confidence in the gun. It CAN do it, it just needs some grooming and care. I'm hoping that my knowledge of barrel maintenance will bring those two shots together with the other three. We'll see.

Kevin

  • Petaluma, CA
Airforce Texan .308
Benjamin Armada .25
Benjamin Prowler .177
Air Venturi compressor