Author Topic: New Mexico pellet laws  (Read 3107 times)

Alan

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New Mexico pellet laws
« on: January 31, 2016, 12:36:12 PM »
In addition to what is posted here, it is legal to use an airgun on rabbits, non-game species (skunk, coyote, prairie dogs, etc.), and non-game species (feral hogs). Interestingly, there is no limit or closed season on rabbits, collared doves, pigeons, skunks, coyotes, prairie dogs, possum, among others.

Crows, house sparrows, and grackles can be taken too, but only if they are posing a threat to livestock and/or crops. Fact is, every ranch and farm owner I know, wants to get rid of all of them!


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, SEPT. 2, 2014

HUNTING SEASONS OPEN FOR DOVES, GROUSE, SQUIRRELS, BAND-TAILED PIGEONS;
PELLET GUNS APPROVED FOR COLLARED DOVES, GROUSE, SQUIRRELS

SANTA FE – Hunting seasons opened Sept. 1 in New Mexico for doves, grouse, squirrels and band-tailed pigeons, with some rule changes that provide more hunting opportunities.

Beginning this year, .177 caliber or larger pellet guns are among the legal sporting arms for Eurasian collared doves, dusky grouse and squirrels. The State Game Commission approved the change Aug. 28 to give hunters more opportunities to bag those species, partly due to the ongoing shortage of .22-caliber ammunition.

The Game Commission also increased the hunting season for Eurasian collared doves – an invasive, non-native species – to year-round with no bag limit. Hunters must leave one wing attached to each collared dove while in the field so conservation officers can differentiate the birds from white-winged or mourning doves, which have a bag limit of 15 birds a day.

Eurasian collared doves are identified by the distinct black and white collar on the back of their neck.

For more details about hunting small game and waterfowl in New Mexico, please visit the Department of Game and Fish website, www.wildlife.state.nm.us, rules and information booklets are available that include maps, season dates, bag limits and more. Information also is available by calling toll-free (888) 248-6866.


  • Roswell, New Mexico
Alan

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Monkeydad1969

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Re: New Mexico pellet laws
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2016, 06:32:44 PM »
So are HOSP's considered invasive there and what about YB's?
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Alan

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Re: New Mexico pellet laws
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2016, 01:12:54 PM »
YB? I looked that up, but didn't find out what it means?

I think it is fair to assume, that if you're hunting on private land with permission, and the person considers any given species a pest, then it is fair game. There is even a provision in the state law, that allows rancher the right to kill wolves, if they are indeed killing livestock. I wouldn't, but I know some that would!
  • Roswell, New Mexico
Alan

I have an Omega compressor. If you're a fellow Guild member, and you pass through Roswell, NM, I'll fill your portable tank as a courtesy.

Monkeydad1969

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Re: New Mexico pellet laws
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2016, 02:24:08 PM »
YB? I looked that up, but didn't find out what it means?

I think it is fair to assume, that if you're hunting on private land with permission, and the person considers any given species a pest, then it is fair game. There is even a provision in the state law, that allows rancher the right to kill wolves, if they are indeed killing livestock. I wouldn't, but I know some that would!

YB---YellowBeak---Starlings.

Seems like HOSP's can be taken whenever since they are an invasive.
  • Aurora, Colorado
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